Eben Moglen:Snowden & the future

From: Rod 
------------------------------------------------------
This site below has these lectures in multiple formats, print, audio, an=
d  =

video. And in many file formats.
The WebM is impressive in Operanext.
---------------------------------------------------
Eben Moglen is a professor of law and legal history at Columbia  =

University, and is the founder, Director-Counsel and Chairman of Softwar=
e  =

Freedom Law Center, whose client list includes numerous pro bono clients=
,  =

such as the Free Software Foundation.

Prof. Eben Moglen's first lecture on the implications of Edward Snowden'=
s  =

revelations. What he has given us and what we need to do now if we want =
to  =

life in a free society in the future
http://snowdenandthefuture.info/index.html


Moglen started out as a computer programming language designer[1] and th=
en  =

received his bachelor's degree from Swarthmore College in 1980, where he=
  =

won the Hicks Prize for Literary Criticism. In 1985, he received a Maste=
r  =

of Philosophy in history and a JD from Yale University. He has held  =

visiting appointments at Harvard University, Tel Aviv University and the=
  =

University of Virginia since 1987.

He was a law clerk to Justice Thurgood Marshall (1986=E2=80=9387 term). =
He joined  =

the faculty of Columbia Law School in 1987, and was admitted to the New =
 =

York bar in 1988.[2] He received a Ph.D. in history from Yale University=
  =

in 1993. Moglen serves as a director of the Public Patent Foundation.

Moglen was part of Philip Zimmermann's defense team, when Zimmermann was=
  =

being investigated over the export of Pretty Good Privacy, a public key =
 =

encryption system, under US export laws.[3]

In 2003 he received the EFF Pioneer Award. In February 2005, he founded =
 =

the Software Freedom Law Center.

Moglen is closely involved with the Free Software Foundation, serving as=
  =

general counsel since 1994 and board member from 2000 to 2007. As counse=
l,  =

Moglen was charged with enforcing the GNU General Public License (GPL) o=
n  =

behalf of the FSF,[4] and later became heavily involved with drafting  =

version 3 of the GPL. On April 23, 2007 he announced in a blog post that=
  =

he would be stepping down from the board of directors of the Free Softwa=
re  =

Foundation. Moglen stated that after the GPLv3 Discussion Draft 3 had be=
en  =

released, he wanted to devote more time to writing, teaching, and the  =

Software Freedom Law Center.[5]



Source Wikipedia


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[OT] Texas Judge gives Patent Troll an Ultimatum

From: Stephen Kraus 
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http://www.networkworld.com/community/blog/judge-orders-patent-troll-explain-its-%E2%80%98mr-sham%E2%80%99-jury

The company in court of a patent troll, and its come out that one of their
'offices' was nothing more than a closet with a landlord who would sign the
papers.

The judge basically wants the patent troll to explain their entire setup
and how this was legal.

Interesting editorial / article on patent trolls

From: John Aldrich 
------------------------------------------------------
I had a tab open to Forbes online from Wednesday when I closed my  
browser (reading up on the Egyptian Coup D'etat) and went to their  
home page this morning (it's quiet at work today) and one of the  
articles they had was a story/editorial about how developers are  
starting to get skittish about patents now...
http://www.forbes.com/sites/haydnshaughnessy/2013/07/04/patent-trolls-are-now-crushing-parts-of-the-developer-economy/

They mentioned one "bright" spot in the whole patent troll wars was  
that there was now a crowd-sourced information service on prior art to  
help defend against patent trolls. Interesting read, I think.

Apple Patent rejected

From: John Aldrich 
------------------------------------------------------
Just read a note on the Washington Post website that the US Patent  
office has rejected a "key" patent (pinch to zoom) that was one of the  
patents at issue in the trial this past summer between Apple and  
Samsung...

Apple patent rejected: The U.S. Patent and Trademark office said  
Wednesday that it has rejected the ?pinch-to-zoom? patent. The  
technology covered by that patent was one of those at issue in the  
summer trial between Apple and Samsung. Samsung was ordered to pay  
Apple more than $1 billion in damages for violating that patent and  
five others.

The Washington Post reported that Apple is expected to ask the office  
to reconsider that decision.

Joe Wilcox declares independence from Apple

From: James Nylen 
------------------------------------------------------
http://betanews.com/2012/07/04/i-declare-independence-from-apple/

Joe Wilcox of BetaNews is moving away from Apple (to Google), at least
partly due to their patent-related bullying behavior.

Is that a good/meaningful choice? Is there any end in sight to the BS
patent-wrangling that companies use to try to cripple their competitors?

Marconi was hacked in 1903 ;P

From: Chad Smith 
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The first hack - offensive, abusive language, complaining about patents and
freedom, particularly about how the hacker could do it better and cheaper -
and how "the man" is messing with his wireless....

100+ years, and the tradition still going strong.

*- Chad W. Smith*
*"I like a man who's middle name is W."*
President George W. Bush - February 10, 2003 bit.ly/gwb-dubya


On Thu, Dec 29, 2011 at 8:34 AM, Rod-Lists  wrote:

> "In June 1903, Gugliemo Marconi and his partner Ambrose Flemming were
> about to give the first demonstration of long-range wireless communication
> at the Royal Institution in London, which, Marconi said, could be sent in
> complete confidentiality with no fear of the messages being hijacked.
> Suddenly, the silence was broken by a huge mysterious wireless pulse strong
> enough to take over the carbon-arc projector and make it sputter messages
> in Morse Code. First, it repeated the word 'Rats' over and over again
> (abusive at that time). Then it tapped out, 'There was a young fellow of
> Italy, who diddled the public quite prettily.' Further rude epithets
> followed. It was Nevil Maskelyne, a stage musician and inventor who was
> annoyed because Marconi's patents prevented him from using wireless. It was
> the first hacking, to demonstrate an insecure system."
>
>
> http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg21228440.700-dotdashdiss-the-gentleman-hackers-1903-lulz.html
> 

Marconi was hacked in 1903 ;P

From: Rod-Lists 
------------------------------------------------------
"In June 1903, Gugliemo Marconi and his partner Ambrose Flemming were about to give the first demonstration of long-range wireless communication at the Royal Institution in London, which, Marconi said, could be sent in complete confidentiality with no fear of the messages being hijacked. Suddenly, the silence was broken by a huge mysterious wireless pulse strong enough to take over the carbon-arc projector and make it sputter messages in Morse Code. First, it repeated the word 'Rats' over and over again (abusive at that time). Then it tapped out, 'There was a young fellow of Italy, who diddled the public quite prettily.' Further rude epithets followed. It was Nevil Maskelyne, a stage musician and inventor who was annoyed because Marconi's patents prevented him from using wireless. It was the first hacking, to demonstrate an insecure system."

http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg21228440.700-dotdashdiss-the-gentleman-hackers-1903-lulz.html

Software Patents and the Debate

From: William Wade 
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So there is a minor Presidential primary debate coming up.  I don't
really care about any of the people, but I was thinking that as
YouTube is allowing for questions, we might try to get a good software
patent question into the mix.  Try to push that issue to the front and
something (I believe) important to the OSS community.

Anyway I made up a question (can anyone come up with a better
wording?) so go vote on it or another one regarding patents (which of
now there are not any...)

http://www.youtube.com/foxnews

-> Vote

Search for patent.

And let us know if you have a better text, and I'll go vote for it!

[Patents] How to force patent invalidation?

From: William Wade 
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So there has been a lot of news regarding software patents and even
Google is getting into the mix in a more public manner.  What I am
wondering if there is a way to go out there and find bad patents and
force the patent office to invalidate them.  The idea would be kind of
a reverse patent troll.  In our spare time find invalid patents and
the necessary proof to prove that they are such and submit it to the
office.  If the patent office handles them anything like patent
applications it should be quite easy ;-)  Plus if enough patents were
being invalidated perhaps it would become less lucrative for trolls.

Anyone know how one would go about this?  It is likely way to hard for
someone like me, but it would be great if we could setup a community
site that was dedicated to deleting bad software patents.

OT: This American Life broadcast on patents

From: Cameron Kilgore 
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Thought this might be interesting for those bent out of shape as a means to
avoid a patent on keeping the perfect human form.

http://www.thisamericanlife.org/radio-archives/episode/441/when-patents-attack

--Cameron 

OT: What

From: Cameron Kilgore 
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Apple hits HTC hard with a win over two
patents,
which could stop imports of HTC handsets.

One of these patents covers the very simple practice of searching a data set
for preformatted data such as a phone number, and adding interaction
to it.
Which
is an interface patent.

Talk amongst yourselves.

--Cameron 

RIAA presents at Chat. Tech Council

From: Mike Harrison 
------------------------------------------------------

I'll leave my personal comments out..
but I won't be going to help keep me from being arrested.

--------------------------------------------------------
Please join us for our April 14th lunch meeting.

FREE to CTC members; $20 non-CTC members. RSVP deadline is Monday, April 
11th. To register, 
http://chatc.org/events/2011/4/14/chattanooga-technology-council-april-lunch-meeting/

Mitch Glazier is Executive Vice President, Government and Industry 
Relations for the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA), the 
Washington D.C.-based trade association that represents hundreds of member 
record companies responsible for creating, manufacturing and distributing 
more than 90 percent of all legitimate sound recordings sold in the United 
States. Glazier serves as the chief advocate for the recorded music 
industry before policymakers and government officials and is responsible 
for industry relations, including the Gold and Platinum Sales Award 
Program.

Glazier, because of his role in policy debates over new media, was named 
as one of the nation’s “50 most influential men under 37,” by 
“Details” magazine.

He has been at the forefront of many of the nation’s cutting-edge policy 
issues, such as copyright law in the digital age, First Amendment-related 
challenges, royalty streams for record companies and artists, and 
international copyright agreements.

Before his tenure with RIAA, Glazier served as Chief Counsel to the 
Subcommittee on Courts and Intellectual Property, Committee on the 
Judiciary, U.S. House of Representatives. The subcommittee has 
jurisdiction over all intellectual property law, including patents, 
copyrights and trademarks. In his capacity as Chief Counsel, Glazier 
served as the chief advisor to the Subcommittee and was responsible for 
working with Members of Congress to craft legislation and amendments, 
organize legislative and oversight hearings and markups, and analyze and 
evaluate legislation referred to the subcommittee.

Glazier also served as law clerk to Judge Wayne R. Andersen, United States 
District Court for the Northern District of Illinois, and practiced law at 
the Chicago law firm Neal, Gerber & Eisenberg as an associate in 
commercial litigation.

Glazier holds a Doctor of Jurisprudence degree from Vanderbilt University 
and a Bachelor of Science degree in Social Policy, cum laude, from 
Northwestern University.  He is a member of the Bars of the State of 
Illinois and the District of Columbia.


patent assignment

From: Ed King 
------------------------------------------------------
brain pickin' time again       

when I pull up Microsoft patents on uspto.gov I usually see a list of names of 
the inventors, which have assigned this patent idea over to Microsoft, eg:

Patent D632,380
Inventors:  Kim; Young Soo (Bellevue, WA), Groene; Ralf (Kirkland, WA), Reed; 
Anthony (Seattle, WA)  
Assignee: Microsoft Corporation (Redmond,  WA)


I assume that the inventors names are Microsoft employees

My boss wants to know what compensation/incentive, if any, was given to these 
inventors in order to make them want to hand over their invention to 
Microsoft.    


My guess was stock options or maybe they are just paid well.