Have you tried KDE lately?

From: Randy Yates 
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I used to be completely against using KDE back in the old Gnome 2 days. KDE
never was stable enough for me for some reason.

I setup a dual boot again today because I really missed having a good Linux
dev environment. I installed Ubuntu and immediately started cussing Unity's
inability to work well with dual displays. I guess these environments built
for mobile devices don't care much about dual displays.

I decided to give KDE a try since that's what I've been using on my Debian
VM in Windows. I'm rather surprised at how much I like it. It seems very
stable these days and it's probably the most advanced desktop environment
I've used in a while.

So, when was the last time you tried KDE?

=============================================================== From: "Robert A. Kelly III" ------------------------------------------------------ I've been kind of back and forth. I was originally a KDE user back in the 3.5.x days, then used Gnome 2, and then Gnome 3, and then Mate for bit. I've also played with some other things, I even used JWM with a custom menu for a really light installation on an older machine. Most recently, I've gone back to KDE 4 which I'm using currently. I do rather like it, although I've run into a few things I haven't gotten to work quite properly yet. For one, I can't seem to change the audio output from my browser. This was working with the system sound tool in Gnome 3, but not in KDE 4. I was initially excited when I looked at instant messaging features, but then I realized that Kopete supports webcam on Yahoo (I have a number of friends on Yahoo), but it doesn't support webcam on XMPP and Kopete is being deprecated in favor of KDE Telepathy. However, KDE Telepathy doesn't support webcam on Yahoo... Nevertheless, I'm rather liking KDE, I just need to fix that pesky sound issue.

=============================================================== From: Ed King ------------------------------------------------------ I never stopped using KDE :)=0A=0Anever was a Gnome fan.=A0=A0=A0 =0A=0Abut= what does it matter, I spend most of my time in the CLI anyway, lol=0A=0A= =0A=0A=0A

=============================================================== From: John Aldrich ------------------------------------------------------ I used to be completely against using KDE back in the old Gnome 2 days. KDE never was stable enough for me for some reason. I setup a dual boot again today because I really missed having a good Linux dev environment. I installed Ubuntu and immediately started cussing Unity's inability to work well with dual displays. I guess these environments built for mobile devices don't care much about dual displays. I decided to give KDE a try since that's what I've been using on my Debian VM in Windows. I'm rather surprised at how much I like it. It seems very stable these days and it's probably the most advanced desktop environment I've used in a while. So, when was the last time you tried KDE?

=============================================================== From: "Robert A. Kelly III" ------------------------------------------------------ Oh, yea... I remember now I had previously been quite happy with Kmail, but found it to be buggy when I recently went back to KDE 4. I can't remember precisely what problems I encountered, but I'm back to using Thunderbird at the moment.

=============================================================== From: Mike Harrison ------------------------------------------------------ I'm with Ed. Even though I'm using a Mac sometimes now, it looks like a bunch of terms and a web browser. Once you are good at command line stuff, even simple drag and drop file management is a royal pain.

=============================================================== From: Unkmar ------------------------------------------------------ I'm with Ed and Mike. CLI doesn't change all that much. usually black on white or reverse of that. Most all the commands and parameters stay the same. Some may say it isn't pretty. I say it works the same way, day in and day out. And working is what I have to get done. I don't like playing with my GUI when there is work I'm trying to get done.

=============================================================== From: Randy Yates ------------------------------------------------------ CLI is great unless you need to visualize something you are working on. For instance, OpenGL games would be difficult to write using nothing but the CLI. Web design is another work related aspect that you still need a GUI for, just so you can see how your site is looking to anyone visiting it. Sure you can use elinks, but that's not going to help you very much with images and such. I wish my work could all be accomplished in the CLI, but the only job I can think of that would allow me to stay in the CLI 100% of the time would be Linux System Admin.

=============================================================== From: Lynn Dixon ------------------------------------------------------ Even as a Linux System Admin, I still need a GUI. We use satellite to manage the environment, and do reporting. I also need a GUI for Solarwinds network monitoring, as well as to manage the VMware environment (mostly console access). Hell, I prefer to manage cups through the web console, than I do via CLI, just seems faster.

=============================================================== From: Dan Lyke ------------------------------------------------------ On Wed, 9 Oct 2013 13:35:42 -0400 Randy Yates wrote: But I think the point is that the widget set of the larger windowing system is largely irrelevant. I start programs that open windows, I alt-tab between those windows, and use those programs. I have a couple-pixel wide border on them for resizing them, and a menu bar for grabbing and dragging them, but beyond that... I've been a GTK widget set user for years, so I kind of headed the Gnome direction desktop-wise. I use Xubuntu, which tends to drag in Gnome components, but frankly if I could wipe all traces of the Gnome keyring manager, of the Gnome inter-app communications bus management stuff, of all of the rest off that Gnome crap off my computer, I'd be happier. I suspect that I have a similar beef with KDE. The Qt widget set? Yeah, sure, widget sets are fine. KDE itself? Don't care. I'd be as happy with FVWM2 managing my workspace and applications. In fact I'd probably be happier, it's just a pain in the ass to get my distro to drop all of that extraneous crap, and I'd have to do it again next time I upgraded my packages. So I tell it to use Metacity or XFCE or whatever "lightweight" window manager it wants, try to shut off as much of the bars and pop-ups and notification scrollers and whatever as I can, and live with the CPU and memory drain. With a sigh. Dan

=============================================================== From: Randy Yates ------------------------------------------------------ You may want to try Awesome WM. You may like it as well. I really like a window manager/desktop environment that just stays out of my way though. I should try out some of the more minimalist WMs out there.

=============================================================== From: John Aldrich ------------------------------------------------------ Quoting Dan Lyke : I'm with you, Dan... a pretty background is nice, but I don't need all the bells and whistles of KDE, which is why I use the window manager I do. I really need to upgrade my box to a new motherboard/CPU with a stand-alone video card instead of one built into the motherboard.

=============================================================== From: James Nylen ------------------------------------------------------ I like xmonad (tiling window manager). It's configured in Haskell, which warps my brain a little, but I like the concept of always using all the available screen space, and once I have it configured the way I want it's rock solid.