OT: RJ45 to Wi-Fi adapter

From: John Aldrich 
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So I bought a refurbished Blu-Ray player awhile back and it's been 
sitting in the package it arrived in since I got it. Now that I have a 
new TV being delivered tomorrow (50" set wouldn't fit in my back seat) I 
got the Blu-Ray player out and put it in place of my VHS/DVD player. To 
my amazement, this Blu-Ray player has an RJ45 network jack on the back.
My question is, does anyone know of a reliable RJ45 to Wi-Fi network 
adapter suitable for use for a multi-media device such as this?

=============================================================== From: John Aldrich ------------------------------------------------------ Looking on Amazon and I found this -- it can use HDM or RJ45: *http://preview.tinyurl.com/l95tcyj *Any experience with something like this* *

=============================================================== From: Bret McHone ------------------------------------------------------ a quick google search for "ethernet to wireless bridge" yielded a number of results. one of which was: http://www.amazon.com/Cisco-Linksys-WET54G-Wireless-G-Ethernet-Bridge/dp/B00008WMBT I've not used it and do not endorse it in any way. It's just to give you an idea of what to look for. best of luck. -Bret

=============================================================== From: "Chris St. Pierre" ------------------------------------------------------ Just brainstorming: I bet you could whip something up quite easily and cheaply with a Raspberry Pi and a wifi dongle. Obviously overkill, but if you ever found something else that worked, hey, you'd have a spare Pi... :)

=============================================================== From: Rip Linton ------------------------------------------------------ John, I have a ZyXEL MWR102 that serves as either an AP or router. I have used it= as a client bridge for streaming media to and from a Blu-Ray drive and to = a TV. I have also used it as a wireless access point for printers. Very small, runs off USB power (it comes with a power supply and a usb cord= ,) and nice setup via web interface. It is much like a small version a DD-W= RT router. Nice unit to keep in a go bag for those times you need flexibility in Inter= net connections too. =20 Rip -----Original Message----- From: John Aldrich <jmaldrich@yahoo.com> To: Chattanooga Unix Gnu Android Linux Users Group <chugalug@chugalug.or= g> Sent: Sat, Jun 1, 2013 9:31 pm Subject: [Chugalug] OT: RJ45 to Wi-Fi adapter =20 =20 =20 So I bought a refurbished Blu-Ray player awhile back and it's been =20 sitting in the package it arrived in since I got it. Now that I have a =20 new TV being delivered tomorrow (50" set wouldn't fit in my back seat) I = =20 got the Blu-Ray player out and put it in place of my VHS/DVD player. To =20 my amazement, this Blu-Ray player has an RJ45 network jack on the back.=20 My question is, does anyone know of a reliable RJ45 to Wi-Fi network =20 adapter suitable for use for a multi-media device such as this?=20

=============================================================== From: John Aldrich ------------------------------------------------------ Thanks Rip. I'll definitely keep that in mind. I saw a /Belkin Universal Wireless HDTV Adapter/on Amazon that looked interesting. .. it'll connect via HDM or RJ45.

=============================================================== From: "Alex Smith (K4RNT)" ------------------------------------------------------ Other options I can think of, in no particular order: 1) Wi-FI network bridge (a router with DD-WRT installed acting as a "client bridge" mode) 2) Buy a sufficienty long CAT6 Ethernet cable 3) Buy a network switch and then follow #2 4) Buy a Wi-Fi network adapter Also do check to see your Blu-Ray player supports Wi-Fi - it might have that capability. A great resource you may want to look into is VideoHelp.com, a really good site with instructions, technical documentation, etc. However, my favorite features on the site include how-to guides for doing a repair work yourself, as well a database of players and recorders, with detailed information, varying from model to model, what video and audio formats they support, etc. They also have unlock codes for many years, some models may have it, some might not. www.videohelp.com Hope this helps. a --=20 " ' With the first link, the chain is forged. The first speech censured, the first thought forbidden, the first freedom denied, chains us all irrevocably.' Those words were uttered by Judge Aaron Satie as wisdom and warning... The first time any man's freedom is trodden on we=E2=80=99re all damaged." - Jean-Luc Picard, quoting Judge Aaron Satie, Star Trek: TNG episode "The Drumhead" - Alex Smith (K4RNT) - Dulles Technology Corridor (Chantilly/Ashburn/Dulles), Virginia USA

=============================================================== From: John Aldrich ------------------------------------------------------ Thanks, Alex... it helps a lot. I'll consider your suggestions. I already considered running a Cat5 under the floor back to the computer room, but I don't like the idea of getting into my crawl space any more than I have to, which is why I was thinking of a WiFi network adapter. As I posted, I found a Belkin branded one designed specifically for multi-media devices (it says TVs, but I figure it should work for BD players just as well. :D) And you're right... I never even thought that the BD player might have a wiFi adapter built in. I'll have to check.

=============================================================== From: John Aldrich ------------------------------------------------------ Duh! Silly me... it appears that it has Wi-Fi built-in. I may still get a Roku, but we'll have to see how this works. May need a new router and will probably need to upgrade my DSL account. :D

=============================================================== From: "Alex Smith (K4RNT)" ------------------------------------------------------ Hey, that's no problem - always a pleasure to help someone out. My setup is a Cat6 from our Verizon FIOS router to the den, and I have a 5-port Netgear gigabit switch connected at that point, where I've hooked up my landlord's Roku device, my housemate's Blu-Ray player, housemate's Onkyo AV receiver, as well as an extra line available for my occasional projects - I'm trying to learn about the Raspberry Pi I ordered a couple months, and out here is where I usually test it out. The RPi looks like a great little device, even just if it's for occasional use or for embedded development. ,