Help building ancient app...

From: DaWorm 
------------------------------------------------------
If this is not appropriate for this list, let me know.

I'm definitely a Linux user, not developer or admin.  So I'm having a bit
of trouble building an ancient (2003) app for doing furniture CAD.

Somewhere a few years back someone managed, by using a set of patches from
a distro called PLD.  Perhaps someone can tell me what I'm doing wrong.

The program is called lignumCAD.  Here's what I've done so far:

Download source rpm (not the tar.gz link!).
http://sourceforge.net/projects/lignumcad/files/lignumCAD/0.2/

Extract source to ~\src

Open terminal, cd ~\src

sudo apt-get install build-essential

sudo apt-get install qt3-apps-dev

sudo apt-get install opencascade4

sudo apt-get install libopencascade-dev

navigate to
http://cvs.pld-linux.org/cgi-bin/viewvc.cgi/cvs/packages/lignumCAD/ and
download all patches
    Click each link, right click on download in "Links to HEAD" and save to
~\src\lignumCAD
(I couldn't get CVS to pull these)

patch -p1 < lignumCAD-gcc4.patch
patch -p1 < lignumCAD-Xft.patch
patch -p1 < lignumCAD-delete-pointer.patch
patch -p1 < lignumCAD-gcc-enum-warning.patch
patch -p1 < lignumCAD-gcc3.patch
patch -p1 < lignumCAD-gcc34.patch
patch -p1 < lignumCAD-gcc41.patch
patch -p1 < lignumCAD-gcc42.patch
patch -p1 < lignumCAD-gcc43.patch
patch -p1 < lignumCAD-gcc44.patch
patch -p1 < lignumCAD-qt3.patch -- had to apply by hand for some reason
patch -p1 < lignumCAD-ui.patch
patch -p1 < lignumCAD-xft.patch

edit lignumCAD.pro
  find unix:INCLUDEPATH, remove "local" from the paths
  comment out both lines with QMAKE

=============================================================== From: "kitepilot@kitepilot.com" ------------------------------------------------------ This a shot in the dark, but... I downloaded lignumCAD.tar.gz and inspected the wine h files (which I wonder why they are there, but go figure) The files are timestamped to 2002. With the information at hand, your build is failing in a #pragma, not even a instruction: And probably is happening because the definitions are so outdated that your achiquitecture don't even exist, so: Download Wine. Replace the libraries in the 'wine' directory with the corresponding file. Load your gun and fire (the build, you'll have time for the gun later... :) I doubt this will work but good luck. I may swing by your location and take a look if you think I can help. ET DaWorm writes:

=============================================================== From: Sean Brewer ------------------------------------------------------ GCC on Ubuntu 12.04 is much newer I believe.. Do gcc -v, and I think it should give you the 4.7 release. The latest GCC patch for your app appears to be for the 4.4 series. You need to do something like this. I haven't tried it, so YMMV. Install GCC 4.4 and friends: $ sudo apt-get install gcc-4.4 g++-4.4 Follow instructions here with additional instructions below: http://askubuntu.com/a/26518 We want to be switching between 4.4 and 4.7, so instead of 4.3 and 4.4 in those instructions use 4.4 and 4.7 Switch to GCC 4.4 compiler as shown in instructions in given link, then attempt to build. Make sure to do qmake clean, make clean, and all that before attempting to build again. m

=============================================================== From: DaWorm ------------------------------------------------------ why. Jeff.

=============================================================== From: DaWorm ------------------------------------------------------ This sounds like it might very well be the answer. Would it be best to install the gcc 4.4 compiler, or figure out the appropriate patch to make it work with the 4.7 compiler? All this is on a laptop at home, so it will be this evening before I can look at it. Thanks for the help, I'll let you know how it goes (and if it works, whether it was worth it, in case there are any other aspiring woodworkers out there who might want a special purpose CAD program). Jeff.

=============================================================== From: Sean Brewer ------------------------------------------------------ Since it's so old, our suggestions could be one thing in a long string of problems. To add to mine, you may need to install other libs, like g++-4.4-multilib and gcc-4.4-multilib as well.

=============================================================== From: DaWorm ------------------------------------------------------ Well, a longer string than the ones I've already found on my own, anyway. And if it doesn't work, there's nothing lost but time. I could do the same sorts of things with Sketchup or any other modern CAD package, but looking through the examples and docs, I really liked the way this was geared to woodworking. Again, thanks for the suggestions. Jeff.

=============================================================== From: DaWorm ------------------------------------------------------ Well, switching to gcc 4.4 (from 4.6) didn't help any. Type to look for updated wine headers. Jeff.

=============================================================== From: DaWorm ------------------------------------------------------ modified a few other easy places where the name of the include file changed, got much farther, but eventually had to give up. When it started wanting stuff from w16.h and a bunch of 16 bit stuff not to be found any more... Too much for me. Will look to a more modern cad system, even if it isn't tailored for woodworking. Jeff.

=============================================================== From: William Wade ------------------------------------------------------ I have one last suggestion that might be worth trying... You can attempt to use the precompiled binaries from the i386 rpm. Follow these instructions: http://www.howtogeek.com/howto/ubuntu/install-an-rpm-package-on-ubuntu-linux/ Then try to run the program from the command line. You are likely to get errors about missing libraries, but you might be able to find the packages that have them, install those, and do a few other tricks to get it to run. Anyway something that is worth a try if you are feeling in the mood. Wil

=============================================================== From: Chad Smith ------------------------------------------------------ I never have anything like these problems using Mac, or Windows for that matter. Just sayin' *ducks* *- Chad W. Smith*

=============================================================== From: David White ------------------------------------------------------ We could always donate to the cause, and port the app into a newer architecture!!! (Just kidding, the only thing I know about C is "Hello World", and how to spot buffer-overflow code if its very simple and I'm looking for it). Sent from my iPhone I have one last suggestion that might be worth trying... You can attempt to use the precompiled binaries from the i386 rpm. Follow these instructions: http://www.howtogeek.com/howto/ubuntu/install-an-rpm-package-on-ubuntu-linux/ Then try to run the program from the command line. You are likely to get errors about missing libraries, but you might be able to find the packages that have them, install those, and do a few other tricks to get it to run. Anyway something that is worth a try if you are feeling in the mood. Wil

=============================================================== From: William Wade ------------------------------------------------------ Tried to run an OS9 app on OSX recently? How about a Win3.1 app on Win8? "Just sayin' "

=============================================================== From: William Wade ------------------------------------------------------ Except that this is a version 0.2 app relying on fairly undone libraries at the time. I am not so sure a simular level of development app would still work in those environments.

=============================================================== From: Chad Smith ------------------------------------------------------ The so-called "ancient app" in question here is from 2003. Any app from 2003 would have been on OS X (and still work natively) or Windows XP (and still work natively). That said, I could easily run any OS 9 app via Sheepshaver and any Windows 3.1 app via DOSBox. Just sayin'. *- Chad W. Smith*

=============================================================== From: John Aldrich ------------------------------------------------------ Quoting DaWorm : Worm, if you really are giving up, I did a quick Google search and found this site which lists a number of Linux-based "CAD" apps. Maybe one of them will work for you - http://www.linuxlinks.com/Software/Graphics/CAD/

=============================================================== From: DaWorm ------------------------------------------------------ learning curve is fairly steep for what I'm wanting to do. This was supposed to be something to save me time by allowing me to lay out a project in advance, not something that I needed to take three months to learn how to use. I liked that this software concentrated on woodworking and took assembly into account (there are a lot of things that you can model that you could never build). For right now, I'm concentrating on only one project, building a bar. I've bought two gorgeous turn of the (last) century heart pine five panel doors that will form the front and sides, and I plan to use vintage newel posts (not yet purchased) for the corners. I also need to build a base with a footrest and the bar top itself. I don't want to buy too much material, and obviously with vintage parts like this, I can't afford to screw up. I could do it all by hand of course, but being a geek, I thought there had to be a "better way". Jeff.

=============================================================== From: John Aldrich ------------------------------------------------------ Quoting DaWorm : Ahh... yeah. Well, you could always use Dia, the Linux version of Visio. :D

=============================================================== From: Ed King ------------------------------------------------------ and then there's good ol' pencil and paper ;-)

=============================================================== From: Stephen Haywood ------------------------------------------------------ I would rather use pencil and paper Dia. Stephen Haywood Information Security Consultant W: www.averagesecurityguy.info T: @averagesecguy

=============================================================== From: Dan Lyke ------------------------------------------------------ On Tue, 8 Jan 2013 08:55:13 -0500 DaWorm wrote:a In my woodworking, I have looked at all sorts of CAD options, from SketchUp to Blender to even laying out the bucks for a SolidWorks license. I sent the QCAD guys a couple of dollars, have tried using Inkscape to do my drawings... In the end I've gone back to paper and pencil. Quick, easy, I can run off a few copies and take 'em out to the shop and mark them up there and not worry about running a router through them. Probably not the answer you were hoping for. Dan

=============================================================== From: DaWorm ------------------------------------------------------ But probably the answer I'll settle on. :) Jeff.

=============================================================== From: Billy ------------------------------------------------------ Wrong. Macintosh version 2 and prior of Adobe Creative Suite only runs on PP= C. "The first version of Adobe Creative Suite was released in September 2003[2]= and Creative Suite 2 in April 2005.[3" Download it for free if you wish: http://www.adobe.com/downloads/cs2

=============================================================== From: Chad Smith ------------------------------------------------------ The question was "Tried to run an OS9 app on OSX recently?" which - as I stated - I can do. But you are right, there are a few specific versions of specific apps that are OS X only and PPC only, and those won't run natively on an Intel Mac running Lion or Mountain Lion. However, they can be run on a PPC emulator like Sheepshaver or PearPC. *- Chad W. Smith*