OT? support

From: Ed King 
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I'm not a PMP project manager nor do I play one on t.v.  

However, my team *delivers* and our systems make money for the company.   We 
don't have any failed projects where the servers are sitting in storage room 
gathering dust.

Now, I never said we were perfect.   Does our software have bugs?  Hell yeah it 
has bugs.   Some of them never got caught during testing because our field users 
are a lot more clever about breaking things than we are.

Anyway, my question is, how many support personnel "should" be expected for any 
given software system of significant complexity?    I know thats kind of a vague 
question.    


I'd love to get some real world examples of how many support folks your software 
has (and the size/complexity of the system being supported)

If a team is constantly cranking out new products, isn't it just common sense 
that the need for support going to increase?    

=============================================================== From: Ed King ------------------------------------------------------ went to Google and searched for "support staff ratio" and found all sorts of "testimonials" and food for thought there's no right/wrong answer but considering 1) how many users we support 2) how many physical locations 3) how many servers 4) tech saavyness of our users 5) how many applications and their complexity I think we're doing pretty effin good with only 2 "support" people. Good to have this thought out, the next time "someone" ask why we need "so much" support. cool, its almost time for my 2 hour lunch break ----- Original Message ---- From: Ed King To: chugalug@chugalug.org Sent: Tue, October 23, 2012 9:04:38 AM Subject: [Chugalug] OT? support I'm not a PMP project manager nor do I play one on t.v. However, my team *delivers* and our systems make money for the company. We don't have any failed projects where the servers are sitting in storage room gathering dust. Now, I never said we were perfect. Does our software have bugs? Hell yeah it has bugs. Some of them never got caught during testing because our field users are a lot more clever about breaking things than we are. Anyway, my question is, how many support personnel "should" be expected for any given software system of significant complexity? I know thats kind of a vague question. I'd love to get some real world examples of how many support folks your software has (and the size/complexity of the system being supported) If a team is constantly cranking out new products, isn't it just common sense that the need for support going to increase?