Android tablets

From: John Aldrich 
------------------------------------------------------
So, after reading this thread on Jelly Bean, I'm tempted to go out and  
buy a new tablet that's got Jelly Bean. Anyone know a decent tablet  
that *will* use Mobile Data, but doesn't require a contract? The thing  
I like about my Dell Streak is that I'm using T-Mobile's "pay as you  
go" service and if something happens (like I get laid off or  
something) I can just not pay next month and I'm not going to get hit  
with a huge cancellation fee. OTOH, I still have access to data  
on-the-go, even if I'm not near an open Wi-Fi hotspot.

I would love to find a tablet that has the latest version of Android,  
has mobile data service and does not require a contract, and all for a  
decent price (

=============================================================== From: Lynn Dixon ------------------------------------------------------ John, I absolutely love my Galaxy Nexus 4G LTE. My company has me on Verizon, but you can get the Galaxy Nexus from other carriers. Its running Jelly Bean and its pretty awesome. Do not fall for the non-Nexus devices, as they wont give you the pure Google Android experience. Thats the beauty of the Android sphere. Device makers are free to use Android in however they wish to serve the customer base they want to target, and they can modify the interface for that market. The other cool thing about Android is that you can choose to stick with the "Google Experience" and buy only Nexus branded devices, which only run pure android without all the other fluff added in by the manufacturer. The Samsung Galaxy Nexus is also a very well built phone in my opinion. I love that I can swap in the larger capacity battery when I need to, and not add any bulk to the phone. I am pretty damn rough on my phones, and I only have a screen protector on my Nexus, and it looks almost new. I have been using it Since early February. It has a huge screen (4.3 or 4.5 inch, cant remember) that is larger than even the "new hotness" iPhone 5. Excellent visibility in direct sunlight, and has a superb battery life. I use my phone ALOT during work hours, and I can charge it overnight, unplug it at 7am, use it all day at work, then take it to class, and by the time I get home at 10pm, it will still have around 30% battery left. and thats on the OEM non-extended battery. Hope that helps!

=============================================================== From: Aaron welch ------------------------------------------------------ That is my one complaint about the new iPhone 5 is that the battery life is half of my iPhone 4 (non-S). -AW

=============================================================== From: John Aldrich ------------------------------------------------------ Quoting Lynn Dixon : Thanks, Lynn... your comments are very helpful, however, you overlooked TWO major requirements - no contract requirement, and sub-$200 range. Last time I looked to get the Mobile-Data-capable version, it was like $100 more than the WIFI-only version, which puts it about $250+. Also, I don't know of any vendor who will sell it w/o a long-term contract. I will gladly be proven wrong, so if you have knowledge that I don't, please feel free to share. :D As a contract employee who could, theoretically be told at any time, "OK, we don't need you any more" I'm reluctant to sign a long-term contract with another wireless carrier.

=============================================================== From: Phil Sieg ------------------------------------------------------ John, 1. Get an android phone (if you don't have one). 2. Get a Straightalk SIM http://www.straighttalk.com/shopsims 3. Get their unlimited Talk & Text & Data plan for $45 a month (my wife = is on this with iPhone 4s and it ROCKS). 4. Root Your android phone and make it a hotspot. 5. Share data with your wifi only tablet (this is how I tether to my = iPad) Done. Great deal, involves a linux variant and minor hacking. Totally list = appropriate. Phil Sieg President SeniorTech LLC / snapf=C5=8Dn=C2=AE www.snapfon.com phil.sieg@seniortechllc.com Phone: 423.535.9968 Fax: 423.265.9820 Mobile: 423.331.0725 "The computer is the most remarkable tool that we've ever come up with. = It's the equivalent of a bicycle for our minds." Steve Jobs, 1955-2011 Verizon, Jelly as beauty of they modify that Nexus fluff opinion. I and not I only been cant Excellent my it at get on the overlooked TWO major requirements - no contract requirement, and = sub-$200 range. Last time I looked to get the Mobile-Data-capable = version, it was like $100 more than the WIFI-only version, which puts it = about $250+. Also, I don't know of any vendor who will sell it w/o a = long-term contract. I will gladly be proven wrong, so if you have = knowledge that I don't, please feel free to share. :D "OK, we don't need you any more" I'm reluctant to sign a long-term = contract with another wireless carrier.

=============================================================== From: Lynn Dixon ------------------------------------------------------ Well, you probably not going to find a $200 tablet with the requirements you mention that has mobile data. The Galaxy Nexus 7 is a really nice tablet, but it doesnt have mobile data right now. Theres rumors of a 3G/4G version coming in the next month or two, but I don't know of any decent $200 tablet running Jelly Bean that ships with mobile data. Heres a link to the rumors: http://androidcommunity.com/nexus-7-3g-headed-to-play-store-this-october-20120903/

=============================================================== From: Lynn Dixon ------------------------------------------------------ Phil, I never knew they had a sim program! Thats pretty awesome! For $45 per month, having a "portable" sim like this would be pretty handy for projects like weather balloon tracking, robotics tracking, mobile hotspots and all kinds of tinker stuff. I hate to get off tangent, but can you tell us what kind of speeds she is seeing on their data network? Hows the coverage? s ) f y t I ot ly n t e t re th

=============================================================== From: Phil Sieg ------------------------------------------------------ It is AT&T 3g data, same speeds side by side with my iPhone 4S on AT&T. Really this is what I will be going to as soon as I can get all of our = corporate phones sorted out. The only iOS drawback is lack of visual = voicemail. Stay away from t-Mobile hardware because their data network is 1700mhz, = and you will be limited to EDGE (2.5G) speeds. Phil Sieg President SeniorTech LLC / snapf=C5=8Dn=C2=AE www.snapfon.com phil.sieg@seniortechllc.com Phone: 423.535.9968 Fax: 423.265.9820 Mobile: 423.331.0725 "The computer is the most remarkable tool that we've ever come up with. = It's the equivalent of a bicycle for our minds." Steve Jobs, 1955-2011 month, having a "portable" sim like this would be pretty handy for = projects like weather balloon tracking, robotics tracking, mobile = hotspots and all kinds of tinker stuff. is seeing on their data network? Hows the coverage? =20 wrote: wife is on this with iPhone 4s and it ROCKS). iPad) appropriate. with. It's the equivalent of a bicycle for our minds." Verizon, Jelly as beauty of however they modify is that Nexus fluff opinion. I and not I only have been inch, cant Excellent my it at I get on the overlooked TWO major requirements - no contract requirement, and = sub-$200 range. Last time I looked to get the Mobile-Data-capable = version, it was like $100 more than the WIFI-only version, which puts it = about $250+. Also, I don't know of any vendor who will sell it w/o a = long-term contract. I will gladly be proven wrong, so if you have = knowledge that I don't, please feel free to share. :D "OK, we don't need you any more" I'm reluctant to sign a long-term = contract with another wireless carrier.

=============================================================== From: Lynn Dixon ------------------------------------------------------ Good advice. Was looking at their site, and noticed they had a different sim for Tmobile and GSM. Do you know if StraightTalk sims get HSPA+ speeds on the ATT 3G network? ts d) of ey at I en nt t t he st ore w e , ith

=============================================================== From: Tim Youngblood ------------------------------------------------------ HSDPA =3D true on ST at 45/ mth. I'm not looking back. The Verizon GNex ate even extended batteries. cts l s , y f t at et ast more ow be o ract

=============================================================== From: John Aldrich ------------------------------------------------------ John, 1. Get an android phone (if you don't have one). 2. Get a Straightalk SIM http://www.straighttalk.com/shopsims 3. Get their unlimited Talk & Text & Data plan for $45 a month (my wife is on this with iPhone 4s and it ROCKS). 4. Root Your android phone and make it a hotspot. 5. Share data with your wifi only tablet (this is how I tether to my iPad) Done. Great deal, involves a linux variant and minor hacking. Totally list appropriate. Thanks for the info, Phil. I'll keep that in mind. However, I'm reluctant to buy and carry yet ANOTHER phone, and I'm happy with the Verizon service I get on my plain ol' cell phone. AT&T service tends to suck compared to Verizon. However, as you pointed out, T-Mobile service sucks even worse, so I may have to go with a pre-paid SIM. I wonder if my Streak could run on AT&T network? Hmm... have to go to the AT&T store and see. :D

=============================================================== From: Phil Sieg ------------------------------------------------------ John, I was a Verizon customer for a LONG LONG TIME. I have traveled everywhere as an AT&T customer and I will say that my = service has been as good as Verizon's everywhere (including rural = areas). Most of the negative hype about AT&T's service was VERY good = marketing by Verizon. The only caveat is that my AT&T service takes a = hit ONLY in very dense urban situations (CES Las Vegas, occasional = sporting events in Chicago, and other high density events). I have NEVER = experienced poor service in and around Chattanooga, Atlanta, Knoxville, = Birmingham, Nashville etc... I am NOT a paid representative for AT&T, in fact I hate the bastards, = but I hate Verizon more for many reasons. My biggest beef with Verizon = and Sprint is that they use CDMA Technology, which has a lot to do with = USA's slow market evolution compared to other countries. Service prices = would now be HALF what they are if ALL USA service providers had always = been GSM. Don't even get me started on how long it took us to get cool = phones!!! Phil Sieg President SeniorTech LLC / Snapfon www.snapfon.com B: 423.535.9968 F: 423.265.9820 M: 423.331.0725 phil.sieg@seniortechllc.com wife is on this with iPhone 4s and it ROCKS). iPad) appropriate. reluctant to buy and carry yet ANOTHER phone, and I'm happy with the = Verizon service I get on my plain ol' cell phone. AT&T service tends to = suck compared to Verizon. However, as you pointed out, T-Mobile service = sucks even worse, so I may have to go with a pre-paid SIM. I wonder if = my Streak could run on AT&T network? Hmm... have to go to the AT&T store = and see. :D

=============================================================== From: Dave Brockman ------------------------------------------------------ -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE----- Hash: SHA1 Phil, I disagree. Your point assumes that cost of technology would dictate pricing to consumers. You and I know better, especially in the land of telecoms, wired or wireless. Regards, dtb - -- "Some things in life can never be fully appreciated nor understood unless experienced firsthand. Some things in networking can never be fully understood by someone who neither builds commercial networking equipment nor runs an operational network." RFC 1925 -----BEGIN PGP SIGNATURE----- Version: GnuPG v2.0.17 (MingW32) Comment: Using GnuPG with Mozilla - http://www.enigmail.net/ iEYEARECAAYFAlB5kagACgkQABP1RO+tr2RYLwCgmqoNzbNNwSZKAf8mu147Maqx yBkAoL9YbjgmXINF2m5CA4XaJmJ8X3Qa =N023 -----END PGP SIGNATURE-----

=============================================================== From: John Aldrich ------------------------------------------------------ John, I was a Verizon customer for a LONG LONG TIME. I have traveled everywhere as an AT&T customer and I will say that my service has been as good as Verizon's everywhere (including rural areas). Most of the negative hype about AT&T's service was VERY good marketing by Verizon. The only caveat is that my AT&T service takes a hit ONLY in very dense urban situations (CES Las Vegas, occasional sporting events in Chicago, and other high density events). I have NEVER experienced poor service in and around Chattanooga, Atlanta, Knoxville, Birmingham, Nashville etc... I am NOT a paid representative for AT&T, in fact I hate the bastards, but I hate Verizon more for many reasons. My biggest beef with Verizon and Sprint is that they use CDMA Technology, which has a lot to do with USA's slow market evolution compared to other countries. Service prices would now be HALF what they are if ALL USA service providers had always been GSM. Don't even get me started on how long it took us to get cool phones!!! Phil, I have tried all the major carriers except AT&T. I found that, in certain areas, such as Ellijay where I used to work, I had cell service where my friends/co-workers who used AT&T did not. THAT is why I am not going to switch to AT&T any time soon for my cell. I might switch to them from T-Mobile for tablet, as Verizon's mobile data plans suck, but again, based on experience, I have had the best service from Verizon. I've used Powertel (now T-Mobile), Sprint/Nextel and Verizon. Of those, only Verizon has had the most reliable service. I see your point about CDMA vs GSM, but unless/until such time as Verizon switches over, we're going to have to have split service.

=============================================================== From: Phil Sieg ------------------------------------------------------ Dave, Actually my assumption is based on other factors: 1. GSM phones make migrating from carrier to carrier easier, even if the devices are initially locked. This would have forced "unlocking" into the mainstream much more quickly, as there is a lot less incentive to "unlock" a CDMA device as it has to be programmed at the "store" to be operable on the network. This alone forces the price of service, and handsets down. 2. Everyone using GSM tower tech would mean much more crossover roaming and reciprocal agreements which results in outstanding coverage for the customer, at least it has in the rest of the world. 3. "Pay as you go" would have developed much more rapidly in a GSM only marketplace, and that has been the single largest factor in driving subscriber costs down. THOSE are the factors I was considering and they are based on my experiences elsewhere in the world, and marginally on my experience as a cellular service provider. Sent from my iPad

=============================================================== From: Dave Brockman ------------------------------------------------------ -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE----- Hash: SHA1 Phil, I'm a little fuzzy on this history. Why exactly is CDMA so prevalent in our great land? I'm not disagreeing with you on the benefits of GSM. I believe there is a reason it is less adopted than it is from a carrier perspective, and some of those benefits are likely exactly why not. Regards, dtb - -- "Some things in life can never be fully appreciated nor understood unless experienced firsthand. Some things in networking can never be fully understood by someone who neither builds commercial networking equipment nor runs an operational network." RFC 1925 -----BEGIN PGP SIGNATURE----- Version: GnuPG v2.0.17 (MingW32) Comment: Using GnuPG with Mozilla - http://www.enigmail.net/ iEYEARECAAYFAlB5oxYACgkQABP1RO+tr2QlzgCcC74Ui03C2GeVI8kSZe0KE0ey dm0AniQ7MeTTC+3q0LLasBQu8z1IhzLR =+mb/ -----END PGP SIGNATURE-----

=============================================================== From: Lynn Dixon ------------------------------------------------------ There are quite a few differences. CDMA uses a single frequency with each phone broadcasting on that same channel, but multiplexed with is unique ID. This makes it easier to hand the phone over to other cells as you travel, since the radio in the phone doesnt have to "re-tune" to a different frequency on the next tower. GSM uses multiple frequencies and multiple channels and a handset will "hop" between which is the less used. This is fine when you are not using the device, but can be a bit tricky for the handset to do while its in use.The main reason GSM sees wide adoption in foreign countries is because of the business models there. The consumers couldn't afford to buy a new phone to switch carriers, and some countries regulations wouldn't allow locked contracts. CDMA in theory can provide faster transmission rates for data, and can allow a more saturated cell, since each phone is multiplexed on the same channel. Its more efficient. GSM used to have problems when an area became saturated, as each phone had to occupy a channel on its own or it would interfere with others. In the US is just made more sense to build a more efficient network that allowed the carriers to add capacity without worrying about saturating a cell. Due to the market at the time, people didn't mind getting locked into a contract to get their handsets cheap or free, so there was no need for a carrier to allow the devices to work on other networks. In the US, the cell network itself was considered a commodity, and was a carriers main competitive advantage, why would a company want to "share" this advantage with a competitor? So, in those days, CDMA was the best technology to go with as it allowed a carrier to grow the network, offer customers the ability to go from cell to cell with no dropped calls, and they didnt have to worry about over saturation. To expand capacity, a CDMA network can just upgrade modulators to add mutliplexing capacity at the tower. For GSM to expand capacity it meant errecting new towers to add more channels on a dfiferent frequency that new customers phones could use. If I were a business at the time, I would have certainly chose CDMA as well, since it gave me expandability at a lower cost, and could theoritically provide better serivce to my customers. This is a very simplified explanation of the differences and why, as there is some really technical details involved. But, I hope it helps! TL;DR: The reason carriers went with CDMA was it meant more capacity, less dropped calls. And no stupid gov regulations meant the carriers could differentiate with what they thought would give them a competitive advantage.

=============================================================== From: Aaron welch ------------------------------------------------------ Bandwidth licensing of the wireless spectrum. Yea FCC! -AW

=============================================================== From: Phil Sieg ------------------------------------------------------ Lynn, WOW. Truly exceptional reply. I knew most/all of that but would have had = to dig into a wiki to articulate it... And am to lazy to write it all = out anyway. There was also the fact that the competing tech "TDMA" (the forerunner = to GSM) was so bad, really, really bad (read inefficient). A lot of the = choices that were being made at the time were based on Qualcomm's new = competing technology (CDMA) that was significantly better than TDMA, and = as such made sense. GSM evolved (if memory serves) parallel to but = slightly behind the original CDMA technology, call it a buying cycle or = two, and that was enough for major carriers in USA to have bought into = the CDMA tech. Phil Sieg President SeniorTech LLC / Snapfon www.snapfon.com B: 423.535.9968 F: 423.265.9820 M: 423.331.0725 phil.sieg@seniortechllc.com each phone broadcasting on that same channel, but multiplexed with is = unique ID. This makes it easier to hand the phone over to other cells = as you travel, since the radio in the phone doesnt have to "re-tune" to = a different frequency on the next tower. GSM uses multiple = frequencies and multiple channels and a handset will "hop" between which = is the less used. This is fine when you are not using the device, but = can be a bit tricky for the handset to do while its in use.The main = reason GSM sees wide adoption in foreign countries is because of the = business models there. The consumers couldn't afford to buy a new phone = to switch carriers, and some countries regulations wouldn't allow locked = contracts.=20 allow a more saturated cell, since each phone is multiplexed on the same = channel. Its more efficient. GSM used to have problems when an area = became saturated, as each phone had to occupy a channel on its own or it = would interfere with others.=20 that allowed the carriers to add capacity without worrying about = saturating a cell. Due to the market at the time, people didn't mind = getting locked into a contract to get their handsets cheap or free, so = there was no need for a carrier to allow the devices to work on other = networks. In the US, the cell network itself was considered a commodity, = and was a carriers main competitive advantage, why would a company want = to "share" this advantage with a competitor? So, in those days, CDMA was = the best technology to go with as it allowed a carrier to grow the = network, offer customers the ability to go from cell to cell with no = dropped calls, and they didnt have to worry about over saturation. To = expand capacity, a CDMA network can just upgrade modulators to add = mutliplexing capacity at the tower. For GSM to expand capacity it meant = errecting new towers to add more channels on a dfiferent frequency that = new customers phones could use.=20 well, since it gave me expandability at a lower cost, and could = theoritically provide better serivce to my customers.=20 there is some really technical details involved. But, I hope it helps! less dropped calls. And no stupid gov regulations meant the carriers = could differentiate with what they thought would give them a competitive = advantage. wrote:

=============================================================== From: Garrett Gaston ------------------------------------------------------ I have a Samsung Galaxy Tab=2C the big screen. I am currently just using th= e wi-fi internet=2C I do not want to pay for additional service apart from = what I have at home. My only complaint is that I can not use it with Linux.= When I plug in the device it will not show up anywhere. I've consulted goo= gle which gave me a bunch of tutorials but they have so far failed. d =20 =20 =20 =20

=============================================================== From: William Wade ------------------------------------------------------ I thought any Android device when plugged in could act as a mass storage device (i.e. like any standard usb drive.)

=============================================================== From: Lynn Dixon ------------------------------------------------------ No most androids are going to the MTP protocol. My galaxy tab 10.1 shows up fine on rhel and Fedora when I install libmtp packages

=============================================================== From: Dan Lyke ------------------------------------------------------ On Sun, 21 Oct 2012 16:42:53 -0700 William Wade wrote: Linux seems to have worked it out, but with some versions of the Sansa Clip and some versions of the kernel and dbus you had to specify USB mode to MTD rather than letting it auto-detect MTD vs MSC. Perhaps? Dan

=============================================================== From: "kitepilot@kitepilot.com" ------------------------------------------------------ You Galaxy Tab is like my Samsung Note. I did some combination of plug it on and set USB and I was able to rsync the whole phone to my Linux puter. I don't remember how I did it, but I'll need to do it again when I get the phone back from repairs. ET Garrett Gaston writes:

=============================================================== From: Garrett Gaston ------------------------------------------------------ I have a lot of mtp packages installed including libmtp9 but still it will = not show up. Date: Sun=2C 21 Oct 2012 20:14:51 -0400 From: boodaddy@gmail.com To: chugalug@chugalug.org Subject: Re: [Chugalug] Android tablets No most androids are going to the MTP protocol. My galaxy tab 10.1 shows up= fine on rhel and Fedora when I install libmtp packages=20 I thought any Android device when plugged in could act as a mass storage device (i.e. like any standard usb drive.) the what en nd

=============================================================== From: Lynn Dixon ------------------------------------------------------ Do you have you tablet set to connect as a media device or a camera?

=============================================================== From: Garrett Gaston ------------------------------------------------------ I don't really know what you mean by setting it as a media device or a came= ra. I just plugged it in and expected it to show up in Nautilus the same wa= y it shows up in Windows Explorer. I have also googled the problem and from= what I've read it doesn't show up in /dev either. From: boodaddy@gmail.com Date: Tue=2C 23 Oct 2012 09:42:39 -0400 To: chugalug@chugalug.org Subject: Re: [Chugalug] Android tablets Do you have you tablet set to connect as a media device or a camera? I have a lot of mtp packages installed including libmtp9 but still it will = not show up. Date: Sun=2C 21 Oct 2012 20:14:51 -0400 From: boodaddy@gmail.com To: chugalug@chugalug.org Subject: Re: [Chugalug] Android tablets No most androids are going to the MTP protocol. My galaxy tab 10.1 shows up= fine on rhel and Fedora when I install libmtp packages=20 I thought any Android device when plugged in could act as a mass storage device (i.e. like any standard usb drive.) the what en nd

=============================================================== From: wes ------------------------------------------------------ try plugging it in while you have the tablet unlocked. the tablet should pop a window asking if you want it to Charge Only, or act as a Mass Storage Device. If it does not, the problem is in the tablet. perhaps in the past this option was presented to someone, and they chose Charge Only, and selected "don't ask again" ? -wes

=============================================================== From: Garrett Gaston ------------------------------------------------------ I'M pretty sure it has something to do with mtp. Apparently android devices= no longer show up as mass storage. From: wes@the-wes.com Date: Tue=2C 23 Oct 2012 07:00:17 -0700 To: chugalug@chugalug.org Subject: Re: [Chugalug] Android tablets try plugging it in while you have the tablet unlocked. the tablet should po= p a window asking if you want it to Charge Only=2C or act as a Mass Storage= Device. If it does not=2C the problem is in the tablet. perhaps in the past this option was presented to someone=2C and they chose = Charge Only=2C and selected "don't ask again" ? -wes I don't really know what you mean by setting it as a media device or a came= ra. I just plugged it in and expected it to show up in Nautilus the same wa= y it shows up in Windows Explorer. I have also googled the problem and from= what I've read it doesn't show up in /dev either. From: boodaddy@gmail.com Date: Tue=2C 23 Oct 2012 09:42:39 -0400 To: chugalug@chugalug.org Subject: Re: [Chugalug] Android tablets Do you have you tablet set to connect as a media device or a camera? I have a lot of mtp packages installed including libmtp9 but still it will = not show up. Date: Sun=2C 21 Oct 2012 20:14:51 -0400 From: boodaddy@gmail.com To: chugalug@chugalug.org Subject: Re: [Chugalug] Android tablets No most androids are going to the MTP protocol. My galaxy tab 10.1 shows up= fine on rhel and Fedora when I install libmtp packages=20 I thought any Android device when plugged in could act as a mass storage device (i.e. like any standard usb drive.) the what en nd

=============================================================== From: Lynn Dixon ------------------------------------------------------ Garrett, Thats exactly what we have been saying. Most of the newer Android devices that ship with onboard storage (and no card slot) will normally show up as MTP, and NOT mass storage. There are several reasons why, but the most important one is to keep users from jacking up the android system files, on a routine USB connection.

=============================================================== From: John Aldrich ------------------------------------------------------ Anyone know anything about the LePan Android Tablet? WalMart has it for about $150. Here's a link to the WalMart webpage: http://snurl.com/25s352o

=============================================================== From: Aaron Welch ------------------------------------------------------ The only Android tablet under $200 I would buy is the Kindle Fire HD. Just my 2 cents. -AW

=============================================================== From: Lynn Dixon ------------------------------------------------------ I will add my 2 cents to Aarons. Might as well spend the extra $50 bucks and get a Kindle Fire. I would also highly recommend the Galaxy Nexus 7 for $199 as well. I rate it equal to a Kindle Fire, but it doesn't have all the "Kindle-ness" good stuff.

=============================================================== From: trevor noblitt ------------------------------------------------------ The nexus 7 isn't a galaxy device it's made by Asus not Samsung.

=============================================================== From: Chad Smith ------------------------------------------------------ I'll add a nickel. I don't know what this "30-pin to USB connector" is - but it sounds like it's trying to be an iPad. For a list dedicated to openness and anti-proprietary-ness I am amazed how much "Buy the more-expensive bastardized vendor-lock-in version" talk I hear when it comes to tablets. I am currently searching for the right tablet myself - as my old one was broken my an unfortunate "I'll fix it by brute force" incident with its idiot owner. As always - ask yourself what you want the device for. Do you need GPS? Do you want expandable storage? Do you plan on using video out? Do you want to hook USB devices into it? What size do you want? It seems, since you picked a 9.7" one that a Kindle Fire would not be a good fit for you (nor would the other more popular $200 models - the Nexus 7 or the Nook). Here's a 10.1 inch Quad-core ICS tablet with BlueTooth, HDMI-out, 8 GB, USB-host/OTG, dual cameras, TF Card slot, 1024 x 600 for $180. http://lightake.com/detail.do/sku.Zenithink

=============================================================== From: Stephen Kraus ------------------------------------------------------ Chad - The 30 Pin connection, used mostly on ASUS tablets, is for the docking station i.e. Transformer series, so you can attach the Tablet to the Docking Station/Laptop. I purchased an Asus 300T for my wife in August, she likes it and so do I.

=============================================================== From: Chad Smith ------------------------------------------------------ Oh, well that's cool then. The Transformer docking idea is very cool. Actually, looking more closely at the Walmart one, it doesn't seem like a bad deal. I just really want a 7" model. I ordered a Motorola 10.1" Lapdock for $40 and I'm going to get some cables to use it with my existing stuff as well as whatever more up-to-date tablet I end up getting. *- Chad W. Smith*

=============================================================== From: John Aldrich ------------------------------------------------------ I like my Dell Streak 10", however, this version of Android is getting a bit long in the tooth, and more and more apps are failing, I'm guessing due to the older version of Android. That being said, I suppose I could try and root this and install one of the un-authorized ports, since this isn't supported anymore anyway. I mean, what's the least that could happen... it stops working entirely. :D Still... it would be nice to have a supported, working tablet, and I'd love to get one on-sale, so I may just wait 'till the "After Christmas" sales and see what is available then. Probably leaning towards an Asus tablet, as those seem to be the most popular, unless someone has a better suggestion... Hmm... ISTR the last time this subject came up, Phil was talking about these great Chinese tablets... :D

=============================================================== From: Mike Harrison ------------------------------------------------------ My Asus transformer prime has become a goto device for skype, SIP/Voip calls, and gtalk. It's a great PDF viewer and doc/email reader when using my laptop.. Nice extra screen. The attached keyboard gives it some insane battery life, makes a nice stand, and allows me to use it as a laptop for SSHing and some other things. Complaints: Everyone that plays with it her in S. Africa threatens to steal it from me. The stores here (which are nice) are about a year behind the US in models.. We've compared it to some of the cheap chinese junk a few of the other dev's here are playing with... it's in a different class. Fantastic screen, bright enough to use outdoors. Every iPad and tablet I see except these has some funky plastic cover on them with or without a rubber keyboard. My Asus has a great fitting screen cover with keyboard, extra battery life, USB and SD slots.. and closed up it is fairly idiot proof. My only design/hwardware complaint: If I could flip the screen around and close it, to hold the keyboard underneath better as a tablet, it would be awesome. Sometimes, in tablet mode, I need a place to stash the keyboard. Android complaints: I've spent a few bucks on apps and games, The few apps I have purchased have been worth the couple of bucks.. World of Goo is wonderful, the rest, honestly, so far, suck. They are revenue creation engines with a pavlovian spend more money hook, not games.

=============================================================== From: John Aldrich ------------------------------------------------------ I have to say that getting a tablet with a keyboard would be nice. That being said, there *are* bluetooth keyboards out there designed for tablets, so I guess as long as I got something that has bluetooth built-in, I should be good on that end (yeah... SSH without a real keyboard sucks! :D) I'm mainly going to use my tablet the way I am my current one - mainly light web browsing, some mobile maps, a few apps (Kroger, Untappd, Facebook, etc) which either work poorly (Facebook) or don't work at all (Kroger, Untappd -- crashes frequently, I think due to old Android version, Pocket Frogs - no longer works.)

=============================================================== From: Garrett Gaston ------------------------------------------------------ My brother has a Kindle Fire and it seems to me to be less of what you woul= d expect of a standard Android device and more amazon geared. From: boodaddy@gmail.com Date: Tue=2C 4 Dec 2012 15:02:25 -0500 To: chugalug@chugalug.org Subject: Re: [Chugalug] Android tablets I will add my 2 cents to Aarons. Might as well spend the extra $50 bucks a= nd get a Kindle Fire. I would also highly recommend the Galaxy Nexus 7 for= $199 as well. I rate it equal to a Kindle Fire=2C but it doesn't have all= the "Kindle-ness" good stuff. On Tue=2C Dec 4=2C 2012 at 2:56 PM=2C Aaron Welch w= rote: The only Android tablet under $200 I would buy is the Kindle Fire HD. Just= my 2 cents. -AW bout $150. Here's a link to the WalMart webpage: http://snurl.com/25s352o

=============================================================== From: Stephen Kraus ------------------------------------------------------ You can easily root the Kindle and Kindle Fire. I rooted my Nook Simple Reader. Android on eInk is fun.