RE: OT: Great router deal

From: Phil Sieg 
------------------------------------------------------

Here is the Techbargains page that gets you the discount:

http://www.techbargains.com/news

=============================================================== From: Lynn Dixon ------------------------------------------------------ I have this router and love it. That's a great deal on it.

=============================================================== From: Ryan Harrell ------------------------------------------------------ I'd rather have a 1U rack-mount that I can install pfSense on, but that's my personal preference. I'm done with consumer routers, I've never had one I was really happy with. --- Ryan Harrell 423-313-6405 www.ryanfreelance.com

=============================================================== From: Dave Brockman ------------------------------------------------------ -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE----- Hash: SHA1 I replace consumer routers on almost a daily basis, especially ones with WiFi built-in. The hardware (CPU mostly) just can't keep up with the traffic of more than one or two users, even a couple of fairly recent vintage that can't sustain WPA2 encryption and 10 MB NAT/Routing, let along 35MB. I know someone on this list with a small handful of pfsense capable boxes that can sustain 35 MB wired + IPSec though :) Regards, dtb - -- "Some things in life can never be fully appreciated nor understood unless experienced firsthand. Some things in networking can never be fully understood by someone who neither builds commercial networking equipment nor runs an operational network." RFC1925 -----BEGIN PGP SIGNATURE----- Version: GnuPG v2.0.17 (MingW32) Comment: Using GnuPG with Mozilla - http://enigmail.mozdev.org/ iEYEARECAAYFAk+VcWMACgkQABP1RO+tr2RdiQCeKIhrPsFEr31qz9bqeLCH+y4i dMwAnRlEjESL8vJ5fxi73qN9/Ll3W2OY =C8CL -----END PGP SIGNATURE-----

=============================================================== From: Chad Smith ------------------------------------------------------ I don't really understand why anyone would pay more than $20 for a router. All it does is connect you to the internet. Why do you need a $65/$125 device for that - much less a rack server? *- Chad W. Smith** *

=============================================================== From: Aaron welch ------------------------------------------------------ "All it does is connect you to the internet." That statement alone... Some of us actually use our firewalls for something other that just "connecting to the internet". Examples: Game Servers Remote Access to internal devices VOIP Remote Support Just to name a few. -AW

=============================================================== From: Randy Yates ------------------------------------------------------ Are you serious or just trolling, Chad? -- Google reads my email!

=============================================================== From: Lynn Dixon ------------------------------------------------------ Im not sure how to respond to this. For me, the N16 does a great job at handling all my connections at 300mbps. I have 3 laptops all connected, plus 2 ROKU's and a PS3. Each connection gets their full bandwidth.

=============================================================== From: Ryan Harrell ------------------------------------------------------ When I switched to pfSense from a later series higher-end Linksys router running dd-wrt, I saw a noticeable increase in throughput on my network, not to mention a DRASTIC increase in stability. Also the configuration options, tracking/monitoring, functionality, etc, that are available in pfSense far exceed those of even dd-wrt. The mesh speed of even a low end atom based system far exceeds any consumer level router out there as well. Also it is worth noticing that tracking bandwidth from a single device on a single connection won't give you a good idea of the real efficiency and throughput of your network. It would be necessary to monitor the system under average load, and monitor the actual incoming/outgoing connections on the router to really assess throughput. We're also not discussing bandwidth across the network, we're talking about bandwidth going in and out of the gateway. (35Mb EPB-Fi connection, etc). Internal traffic shouldn't really even impact the router that much if you've got your network set up properly. Also a note on wireless bandwidth. Because of protocol overhead, you'll never get anywhere close to 300Mb/s on N. Most connections I've tested, especially on consumer grade routers, you'll get maybe a third of that (if you're extremely lucky!) in actually usable bandwidth. For example 300Mb/s should be about 40MB/s, but if you look at actual throughput using netcat straight to eliminate protocol overhead, you'll max out at maybe 7 or 8 MB/s. With the additional overhead of the CIFS protocol for example, you'll be luck to clear 4MB/s. There's a lot more going on related to channel bonding, etc, in N mode, so that's a bit of an oversimplification, but just to say, don't expect to get a true 300Mb/s out of wireless N. --- Ryan Harrell 423-313-6405 www.ryanfreelance.com

=============================================================== From: Ryan Harrell ------------------------------------------------------ Also it is worth noting pfSense is free, and I would imagine most of us have the hardware laying around to through together a no-frills server with couple network cards in it to run it on. So basically you get an extremely functional and stable router for free. --- Ryan Harrell 423-313-6405 www.ryanfreelance.com

=============================================================== From: Chad Smith ------------------------------------------------------ I have a PS3, Xbox 360, MacBook Pro, iPad, iPod Touch, Acer Iconia A100, HP Touchpad, Nokia N900, Nintendo 3DS, Sony PSP, and Onlive MicroConsole all connected to my Uverse supplied Router/modem (2Wire) - and a freebie 4port switch. I can stream movies from my Wireless Macbook or Wireless Tablet to my Etherneted PS3 in full 1080p HD. I can play MMORPGs with no lag in full res on my computer. I can play hosted games on my Onlive, or through my devices.., Granted - I'm not using all of these at the same time - but usually at least 3 of them. Not to mention my TV is actually FiOS as well. And - yes - I do use my built-in router-based firewall. So... again... I don't see the point in paying real money for a router. *- Chad W. Smith** *

=============================================================== From: Lynn Dixon ------------------------------------------------------ I have an IBM x3650 with an additional 4 nic cards that have 2 gigabit ports each on them. This give the machine a total of 10 useable gigabit interfaces. It is serving as my DNS, and DHCP as well as my CIFS share center, and hosting a ton of VMs for my RHCE practice lab. I use a Cisco/Linksys SRW2016 switch (oldy, but goody) as the central switch, and I use my N16 for the gateway to the internet and as a wireless AP. My three laptops usually have a metric crap ton of torrents run on at least 2 of them. I have a Comcast Xfinity 50 meg connection. I normally have my gateway connection maxed out on its 50 meg with all the data I am transfering over the weekends. The Asus N16 handles it all very well. I dont have exact numbers, but I dont recall copying to and from my CIFS shares over wifi only being as slow as 4MB/s. When I copy large files such as entire series of shows for my wife to her laptop, it goes insanely quick. I'll do some testing this weekend if I have time.

=============================================================== From: Benjamin Stewart ------------------------------------------------------ When it comes to these little Linksys devices, I'm with you Chad. I don't like to pay any more than $25 for one. However, the one in question is also capable of functioning as a print server, and as a VOIP PBX, and as a NAS, or perhaps with some techno-wizardry, even as a homebrew pogoplug. $65 is a pretty good price for all of that functionality in one little box! HP t l res ast . te: 25 th ll

=============================================================== From: Dave Brockman ------------------------------------------------------ -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE----- Hash: SHA1 To be fair, the N16 is a little beefier than most "Best Buy" CPE. Some of the higher end (not Linksys, think Netgear, Buffalo, ASUS, etc) can actually be decent little devices. Most of those start in the $150 range though. I don't think that wireless math is quite right either. You can go ahead and chop 300MB in half due to the nature of the "physical" medium, MIMO only partially helps this. Myself, I'll take a cable any day. Regards, dtb - -- "Some things in life can never be fully appreciated nor understood unless experienced firsthand. Some things in networking can never be fully understood by someone who neither builds commercial networking equipment nor runs an operational network." RFC1925 -----BEGIN PGP SIGNATURE----- Version: GnuPG v2.0.17 (MingW32) Comment: Using GnuPG with Mozilla - http://enigmail.mozdev.org/ iEYEARECAAYFAk+V34YACgkQABP1RO+tr2RGygCfe4eWautkbH5/rlB8S9Znj3Qk t3wAnjWUtokmAyFby+oaRUgoxdEGe+U7 =T8EU -----END PGP SIGNATURE-----

=============================================================== From: Aaron Welch ------------------------------------------------------ You can guesstimate wireless performance by halfing the available bandwidth f= or each new host you add. That was the quick way we were taught by Cisco in= the CCDA classes. -AW

=============================================================== From: Bret McHone ------------------------------------------------------ Yup. Only one wireless device on that frequency can talk at a time (ie.. = half duplex). that includes the AP and all clients within earshot of the = client/AP.=20 -B bandwidth for each new host you add. That was the quick way we were = taught by Cisco in the CCDA classes.