<div dir="ltr">I don't know if this analogy really works. I have albums I got on iTunes that I have listened to for a longer period of time than I had a working cassette tape (via iPods from 11 years ago till my iPhone now). My cassette tape system that offered no upgrade path whatsoever. When I got a CD player, I had to re-purchase all my media. Now, I won't have to every re-buy it. <div>
<br></div><div>I have a 4 year old iMac going strong and it gets used every day, and I don't see it being replaced until it's totally dead. Now, I'll say that some of my devices I have can't do all the shit the latest stuff does, but it's not like any of this suddenly stops working. I don't see it the same way as you, I guess. A dictator will have you shot. A product line available in a marketplace must compete with other similar products. I like my Apple shit because it all works together really, really well. I don't ever have to edit some conf file. The price to switch to another platform would be huge, so I guess in that way it's kinda sucks... but that it true for any platform. Hardware upgrades are expensive on any platform.</div>
<div><br></div><div>I love my Linux servers (I have 5 linodes), but would honestly not seriously consider it as an option for my home and family systems. I did for a while. I had a Linux media server, my wife had Ubuntu on her desktop and my oldest daughter still has her Nexus 7 tablet. But after that experience or trying to have a "linux" household, I will stick will Apple because it's just awesome... but I don't feel held hostage to buy every upgrade. Since 2007 I've bought 5 computers, two Linux and 3 Macs, and the three Macs are the ones still running.</div>
<div><br></div><div>Of course, it's all just my personal experience and views.</div></div>