<div dir="ltr">wes,<div>Red Hat does a great job of pruning out old kernels.  I manage about 100 or so RHEL5 and RHEL6 machines (even some RHEL4), and all of our machines have 500 meg boot partitions.  Some have been around for years, and have seen many kernel updates, and we have never had an issue with /boot getting filled. </div>

</div><div class="gmail_extra"><br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Tue, Nov 12, 2013 at 2:49 PM, wes <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:wes@the-wes.com" target="_blank">wes@the-wes.com</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">

<div dir="ltr">that's the problem I've seen... every time a system update includes a new kernel, it keeps the old one, and never prunes them.<div><br></div><div>-wes</div></div><div class="gmail_extra"><br><br><div class="gmail_quote">



On Tue, Nov 12, 2013 at 8:34 AM, Randy Yates <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:lpcustom@gmail.com" target="_blank">lpcustom@gmail.com</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">



<div dir="ltr">I'm just curious as to why one would need 1gb for /boot. Are we keeping the last 10 kernels just in case? Or is there another reason I'm missing?</div><div class="gmail_extra"><div><div>
<br>
<br><div class="gmail_quote">
On Tue, Nov 12, 2013 at 10:47 AM, John Aldrich <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:jmaldrich@yahoo.com" target="_blank">jmaldrich@yahoo.com</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">




<div><div>Quoting Mike Harrison <<a href="mailto:cluon@geeklabs.com" target="_blank">cluon@geeklabs.com</a>>:<br>
<br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
On Mon, 11 Nov 2013, Lynn Dixon wrote:<br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
We have always ran 500MB for our /boot on our RHEL4, RHEL5, and  RHEL6 machines.  <br>
Having said that, we are also very proactive  when it comes to  server maintenance as well.  <br>
</blockquote>
<br>
Sometimes I babysit systems that don't get accessed very often, or<br>
can't be accessed very often.<br>
<br>
And this was an Ubuntu system.. with 900mb,<br>
<br>
I noticed the Redhat systems I just put up used a 500mb partition,<br>
and left it.. I'm not sure (yet) how well Yum cleans up /boot<br>
after new kernals. But I'll be babysitting them closer.<br>
<br>
</blockquote></div></div>
Redhat / Fedora does a pretty good job of cleaning up after new kernels.<div><div><br>
______________________________<u></u>_________________<br>
Chugalug mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Chugalug@chugalug.org" target="_blank">Chugalug@chugalug.org</a><br>
<a href="http://chugalug.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/chugalug" target="_blank">http://chugalug.org/cgi-bin/<u></u>mailman/listinfo/chugalug</a><br>
</div></div></blockquote></div><br><br clear="all"><span class="HOEnZb"><font color="#888888"><div><br></div></font></span></div></div><span class="HOEnZb"><font color="#888888"><span><font color="#888888">-- <br>Google reads my email!
</font></span></font></span></div><span class="HOEnZb"><font color="#888888">
<br>_______________________________________________<br>
Chugalug mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Chugalug@chugalug.org" target="_blank">Chugalug@chugalug.org</a><br>
<a href="http://chugalug.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/chugalug" target="_blank">http://chugalug.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/chugalug</a><br>
<br></font></span></blockquote></div><br></div>
<br>_______________________________________________<br>
Chugalug mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Chugalug@chugalug.org">Chugalug@chugalug.org</a><br>
<a href="http://chugalug.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/chugalug" target="_blank">http://chugalug.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/chugalug</a><br>
<br></blockquote></div><br></div>