<div dir="ltr">I may be talking out the wrong orifice here, but my version of VLC has a "convert/save" menu item. Perhaps this could be helpful to you?<div><br></div><div>-wes</div></div><div class="gmail_extra">

<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Sun, Nov 10, 2013 at 6:22 PM, Robert A. Kelly III <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:bluethegrappler@gmail.com" target="_blank">bluethegrappler@gmail.com</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">

When you are actually playing back media, VLC handles errors really<br>
well. You can play a scratched up DVD and you may notice some glitches<br>
when it hits a bad spot, but it recovers and continues playing. I have<br>
seen VLC play some discs that other media players refused to. However,<br>
if you are trying to transcode from a disc that is scratched, or a<br>
source file that has some form of corruption, it seems to transcode<br>
until it hits an error and simply stops. Is there any way to get the<br>
more resilient behaviour when transcoding, so that it will finish even<br>
if there are glitches in the finished output? It would be better to have<br>
a complete video with a few glitches, than to have only half a video.<br>
_______________________________________________<br>
Chugalug mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Chugalug@chugalug.org">Chugalug@chugalug.org</a><br>
<a href="http://chugalug.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/chugalug" target="_blank">http://chugalug.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/chugalug</a><br>
</blockquote></div><br></div>