<div dir="ltr">conceptually, you could think of a certificate as sort of a kajillion-character-long password.<div><br></div><div>additionally, both sides don't have the same cert/password: they each get a mutually compatible one. these are called the "public key" and the "private key".</div>

<div><br></div><div>example:</div><div><br></div><div>abcdefghijklm -> encrypted via private key -> @!#%$@#%^%$*&</div><div>abcdefghijklm -> encrypted via public key -> &*)^&*$%^@$#$</div><div><br>

</div><div>@!#%$@#%^%$*& -> decrypted via public key -> abcdefghijklm</div><div>@!#%$@#%^%$*& -> decrypted via wrong key -> ^$%#$%@#$@$^%</div><div><br></div><div>point being, data encrypted by one key can only be decrypted by the other key, not even by the same key it was originally encrypted with.</div>

<div><br></div><div>a "certificate" is a key (public or private) which also contains extra info about the who/what/when/where/why of the situation. this is used to ensure that the proper keys are being used.</div>

<div><br></div><div><div>-wes<br></div></div></div><div class="gmail_extra"><br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Fri, Sep 6, 2013 at 6:20 PM, Rod <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:rod-lists@epbfi.com" target="_blank">rod-lists@epbfi.com</a>></span> wrote:<br>

<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">What is the difference between a cert and a PSK?<div class="HOEnZb"><div class="h5"><br>
<br>
On Fri, 06 Sep 2013 00:29:25 -0400, Mike Robinson <<a href="mailto:miker@sundialservices.com" target="_blank">miker@sundialservices.com</a>> wrote:<br>
<br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
"++" for OpenVPN (and TunnelBlick on a Mac).<br>
<br>
These packages work extremely well, and are very easy to set up ... provided that you always keep firmly in mind the fact that VPN is designed to tell "Eve" absolutely Nothing.  Until you get things set up just-right, VPN by design will basically give you =no= clues as to what's wrong.  Pay very, very close attention to details (as VPN itself does).  For instance, one client had a devil of a time with a certificate, until we noticed that the state-name was "VA" in one place, and "Va" in another.  That was the difference that made all the difference.  Heh.  And the message?  Something about "self-signed certificate in chain."  Heh.  Welcome to the world of VPN error-messages.<br>


<br>
Be sure to secure the link with certificates, not passwords (a.k.a. "pre-shared keys" or PSKs).<br>
<br>
VPN definitely trumps SSH in my opinion because "providing a secure tunnel" is what VPN was foremost designed to do.  "It's just there, and by-the-by it's secure."  The fact that it's supported by many off-the-shelf routers is an added bonus.<br>


</blockquote>
<br>
<br></div></div><span class="HOEnZb"><font color="#888888">
-- <br>
Using Opera's mail client: <a href="http://www.opera.com/mail/" target="_blank">http://www.opera.com/mail/</a><br>
______________________________<u></u>_________________<br>
Chugalug mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Chugalug@chugalug.org" target="_blank">Chugalug@chugalug.org</a><br>
<a href="http://chugalug.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/chugalug" target="_blank">http://chugalug.org/cgi-bin/<u></u>mailman/listinfo/chugalug</a><br>
</font></span></blockquote></div><br></div>