<html>
  <head>
    <meta content="text/html; charset=ISO-8859-1"
      http-equiv="Content-Type">
  </head>
  <body bgcolor="#FFFFFF" text="#000000">
    <div class="moz-cite-prefix">On 04/15/2013 07:00 PM, Chad Smith
      wrote:<br>
    </div>
    <blockquote
cite="mid:CAP=JDPtLNGch5-Eb9NPMU+XmrEX=zvz0iTG-g6odCZT1SqFMFA@mail.gmail.com"
      type="cite">
      <div dir="ltr">I don't think it is far to say that because
        economists' predictions may have an effect on the system they
        are addressing, that Economics as a whole is "not a science".
         If that is true, then I guess Physics isn't a science, either.
         <a moz-do-not-send="true"
          href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Observer_effect_%28physics%29">http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Observer_effect_(physics)</a>
        <div>
          <br>
        </div>
        <div>I would think there would have to be those who choose to
          use their voice as an "Expert" to sway public opinion one way
          or another, for their own benefit - but i would say the same
          could be said for a doctor who is giving advice to a patient
          who may benefit from a treatment that the said doctor does not
          perform, or one that they do.  That doesn't mean Medicine is
          not a science.</div>
        <div><br>
        </div>
        <div style="">Yes, "self-fulfilling prophecies" exist.  Yes,
          economists have just as much of a chance of being evil liars
          as any other human being.  That doesn't negate the value of
          the study as a whole.  Economics is much like Psychology, it
          is not a "Hard Science" - but it is a science.</div>
        <div style=""><br>
        </div>
        <div style="">Now, if you do not accept non-hard sciences as
          science at all, let's talk about Quantum Physics.</div>
        <div>
          <div class="gmail_extra"><br clear="all">
            <div><font size="4"><i><span
                    style="font-family:garamond,serif">-</span><font
                    style="font-family:garamond,serif"> Chad W. Smith</font></i></font></div>
          </div>
        </div>
      </div>
      <br>
    </blockquote>
    +1. I, for one, think that if we were to listen more to the academic
    economists than those employed by the financial institutions, that
    we would be much better off. That being said, most "credible news
    sources" will get their "experts" from some financial institution,
    which really sucks, IMHO.<br>
    <br>
  </body>
</html>