<div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_extra">This is even more off topic, but people are really bad at predicting the future (often worse than a coin toss). This is one of the issues that the¬†Aggregative Contingent Estimation Program is trying to work on. (Best place to learn about it is: <a href="http://goodjudgmentproject.com/blog/?p=87">http://goodjudgmentproject.com/blog/?p=87</a> which is one of the teams.) Some of these teams are predicting events well due to training regarding biases, some research, and a fair number of people.</div>

<div class="gmail_extra"><br></div><div class="gmail_extra" style>Also on the subject, although not always the best source, generally a good lay source:¬†<a href="http://www.freakonomics.com/2011/09/14/new-freakonomics-radio-podcast-the-folly-of-prediction/">http://www.freakonomics.com/2011/09/14/new-freakonomics-radio-podcast-the-folly-of-prediction/</a></div>

<div class="gmail_extra"><br></div><div class="gmail_extra"><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Mon, Apr 15, 2013 at 11:17 AM, Stephen Kraus <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:ub3ratl4sf00@gmail.com" target="_blank">ub3ratl4sf00@gmail.com</a>></span> wrote:<br>

<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left-width:1px;border-left-color:rgb(204,204,204);border-left-style:solid;padding-left:1ex">Paul Krugman actually predicted the housing crisis. A few economists did actually.</blockquote>

</div><br><br></div></div>