Advertising, physical media, compilation of resources, awareness of the product itself, gathering documentation...  Not everyone has broadband, even today - much less however many years ago that was.  So they could buy a CD, or spend a week downloading things over dial-up, and hope no one calls during that time, or that AOL doesn't just crap out on them.<div>

<br><div>I designed labels for it, and wrote an installer screen that would walk people through what was on the disc and linked to the install files on the CD itself, as well as online documentation.<br><div><br></div><div>

I also discussed that with the leadership of the OpenOffice.org team, as well as the mailing lists, before I did it.  I didn't violate any laws or any licenses.</div><div><br></div><div>There were, and probably still are, companies that box and sell open source software in Big Box stores.  Sometimes rebranded, sometimes not.  I was doing the same thing they did.</div>

<div><br></div><div>I did, however, violate an ebay rule that I did not know about - you cannot sell burned CDs at all.  Even if they are recordings of original music that you yourself wrote and performed - or software that you yourself coded from scratch.  I did not know that rule existed at the time - and since learning about it - I have not sold any CDs or DVDs on ebay since.</div>

<div><br></div><div><div><div><font size="4"><i><span style="font-family:garamond,serif">-</span><font style="font-family:garamond,serif"> Chad W. Smith</font></i></font></div><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Fri, Dec 14, 2012 at 2:02 PM, Ed King <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:chevyiinova@bellsouth.net" target="_blank">chevyiinova@bellsouth.net</a>></span> wrote:<br>

<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div><div style="font-family:Courier New,courier,monaco,monospace,sans-serif;font-size:10pt"><div>what "value" did you add to the open office org cds on ebay?</div>

</div></div></blockquote></div></div></div></div></div>