You can make money on free/freedom/no-cost software.  You charge for documentation, installation, physical copies, (which include packaging, shipping, handling, and materials), support, seminars, training, non-free add-ons, plug-ins, templates, extensions...<div>

<br></div><div>You make a free version that is bare-bones, and then add stuff in for a non-free "upgrade"...</div><div><br></div><div>There are lots of ways.  Put ads in it.  Yes, if the code is free, it could be stripped out, but a lot of people don't know how to code, or compile.</div>

<div><br></div><div>None of the above is nearly as easy or straightforward as charging for the software, of course.</div><div><div><font size="4"><i><span style="font-family:garamond,serif"><br></span></i></font></div><div>

<i style="font-size:large"><span style="font-family:garamond,serif">-</span><font style="font-family:garamond,serif"> Chad W. Smith</font></i></div><div><div><font size="1"></font></div></div><br>
<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Wed, Dec 12, 2012 at 11:28 AM, Garrett Gaston <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:garrett85@hotmail.com" target="_blank">garrett85@hotmail.com</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">




<div><div dir="ltr">
This was a much bigger response than I was expecting. I herd Stallman say that he was not opposed to software that is sold for a profit. But if all source code everywhere is always free to everyone I would expect it to be nearly impossible to bring home the bacon, since everyone who gets that freely available source code would no longer need to purchase the software. Am I missing something here?</div>

</div></blockquote></div></div>