I agree that very few stockholders do take an active interest in the companies they own stock in - however the Board, who is there on the behalf on the stockholders - has a vested interest in the company succeeding.  While it is true that there is a difference between the company doing well and the stock doing well - if the company goes belly up the stocks are useless.<div>

<br></div><div>So unless you believe the board of directors on multitudes of companies are receiving some sort of kick back from the Execs' Golden Parachute that is enough to screw over the stockholders that put them on the board in the first place - then I think there is another problem.  Something perhaps more basic and less devious.  Something like people really believe in the power of one person being able to come in and "save the company".  I think that fairy tale - which, I admit, does have some real life examples of working - is destructive far more often than it is helpful.</div>

<div><br></div><div>I mean, in the minds of the Board, if this one guy can come in and "save the company" then its worth 10% of a years profit to get him to sign up.  I mean, if it ends up giving the company 50 more years of profit.</div>

<div><br></div><div>Not every exec is Steve Jobs, Lee Iacocca, Thomas Edison, Sam Walton, or Bill Gates.  Not every company needs an all powerful leader.  They are looking for a magic bullet when they need to do some serious restructuring - and that doesn't mean just laying a bunch of the lowest paid people off - that means literally restructuring.  Rebuilding the way the company does business.  That takes hard work, good ideas, a willingness to try new things and let go of old things, and is just as likely to end in failure as not.  But it's more likely to fix the problem than just hiring Mr. Hot Shot Big Wig CEO.<br>

<div><br clear="all"><font size="4"><i><span style="font-family:garamond,serif">-</span><font style="font-family:garamond,serif"> Chad W. Smith</font></i></font><div><font size="1"></font></div><br>
<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Sun, Dec 2, 2012 at 8:13 PM, Dan Lyke <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:danlyke@flutterby.com" target="_blank">danlyke@flutterby.com</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">

<div class="im">On Sun, 2 Dec 2012 12:49:28 -0600<br>
Chad Smith <<a href="mailto:chad78@gmail.com">chad78@gmail.com</a>> wrote:<br>
> Stockholders who don't care if the company does well or not...<br>
> That's a new piece of FUD for the class warfare I haven't heard yet.<br>
<br>
</div>You're missing a nuance: There's a substantial amount of economic<br>
friction between the process of having money in a 401k mutual fund and<br>
taking an active interest in the running of a company.<br>
<br>
The management class we're all whining about is strip-mining that space.<br>
<div class="HOEnZb"><div class="h5"><br>
Dan<br>
_______________________________________________<br>
Chugalug mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Chugalug@chugalug.org">Chugalug@chugalug.org</a><br>
<a href="http://chugalug.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/chugalug" target="_blank">http://chugalug.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/chugalug</a><br>
</div></div></blockquote></div><br></div></div>