A story broke a couple of weeks ago about ISP's voluntarily participating in a copyright alert system.<div><br></div><div><a href="http://thehill.com/blogs/hillicon-valley/technology/262315-internet-providers-set-to-crack-down-on-illegal-file-sharing">http://thehill.com/blogs/hillicon-valley/technology/262315-internet-providers-set-to-crack-down-on-illegal-file-sharing</a></div>
<div><br></div><div> Essentially, intellectual property holders will flag an IP address for peer-to-peer sharing and let the ISP know. The ISP will then send alerts to suspected users letting them know they have been flagged. They might also put them in a "walled-garden" where they will force fed "educational material" that they must read before leaving. Two questions for anyone who might know.<div>
<br></div><div>1. What is the nature of the alerts? HTTP redirects, DNS redirects, Java script inserted into legitimate pages? I couldn't seem to find anything on this.</div><div>2. Why would ISPs voluntarily participate in a program like this? I have a few guesses such as it will save them from future litigation or the content owners are paying them directly. But, does anyone have evidence on why they are doing this? </div>
<div><br></div><div>I have heard this referred to as "SOPA-lite".</div><div><br></div><div>Thanks,</div><div><br></div><div>Chris<br clear="all"><div><br></div>-- <br>Chris Rimondi | <a href="http://twitter.com/crimondi">http://twitter.com/crimondi</a><br>

</div></div>