Thanks for the tips.  I don't have much experience in this area so I will probably be back to ask more questions.<div><br></div><div>My plan was to have a simple web server running on Arduino which would just accept basic commands over HTTP or some simpler protocol.  Someone's already written the web server code (<a href="https://github.com/sirleech/Webduino">https://github.com/sirleech/Webduino</a>).  Anything more rich (like presenting a web front-end) would be handled by a program running on a real computer with a real web server.  I should have said LAN-enabled instead of internet-enabled.</div>
<div><br></div><div>So I would either have to:</div><div><br></div><div>1) Buy an Arduino + Ethernet shield, and connect sensors to it</div><div><br></div><div>2) Buy a RPi + some kind of add-on board for connecting sensors (as far as I can tell, several are in development, but Arduino is a more mature platform for connecting stuff to the real world)</div>
<div><br></div><div>The fact that I would still have to buy an add-on board for RPi seems to be a good argument in favor of using Arduino.</div><div><br></div><div>Is any of that wrong?  Is that a good approach, or would you still say to use a RPi?</div>
<div><br></div><div><br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Mon, Oct 22, 2012 at 10:22 AM, Dan Lyke <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:danlyke@flutterby.com" target="_blank">danlyke@flutterby.com</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
<div class="im">On Sun, 21 Oct 2012 23:13:31 -0400<br>
James Nylen <<a href="mailto:jnylen@gmail.com">jnylen@gmail.com</a>> wrote:<br>
> I have lots of stuff I'd like to do with small Internet-enabled<br>
> devices too.  I think RPi is overkill for most of them though.<br>
<br>
</div>Yeah, probably, but consider the problem of prototyping: Unless<br>
you're building your own hardware, a Raspberry Pi is not substantially<br>
more expensive than an Arduino. So the question is: Which is easier<br>
to turn into a full-featured web device?<br>
<br>
Sure, you can play around with an EtherShield and a tiny TCP/IP stack<br>
web and create a little web server in C that carefully manages limited<br>
flash avaoilable on an 8 bit embedded device. And this is a great<br>
strategy if you get to amortize your development costs over a couple<br>
of thousand or tens of thousands of devices.<br>
<br>
But a full on ARM device with Linux and an SD card lets you build your<br>
web server with Perl, not worry about squeezing out the unused bits of<br>
jQuery, and so forth.<br>
<br>
If you were building that sous vide cooker for the mass market? Start<br>
with Arduino and spend a bunch of money getting your parts cost down.<br>
If you're building it for you? Then we get to...<br>
<div class="im"><br>
> I'm leaning towards Arduino for those things, but I need to do more<br>
> research and find the time.<br>
<br>
</div>"find the time". Exactly. This is why I won't look askance at anyone<br>
who decides a Raspberry Pi makes a great Christmas Tree sequencer (to<br>
take a project I built from laying out my own board a few years ago<br>
as an example).<br>
<div class="HOEnZb"><div class="h5"><br>
Dan<br>
_______________________________________________<br>
Chugalug mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Chugalug@chugalug.org">Chugalug@chugalug.org</a><br>
<a href="http://chugalug.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/chugalug" target="_blank">http://chugalug.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/chugalug</a><br>
</div></div></blockquote></div><br></div>