Before anyone freaks out, I'm not bashing your opinion. Everybody has their own needs. Some people are content with one thing while others prefer something else. I find everyone's input useful for the type of work that I do. I can appreciate the fact that Chad likes to buy a new piece of hardware every year, as it puts money in my pocket. I can also appreciate the users that like to stick with one piece of hardware as it makes my job easier.<br>
<br><div class="gmail_quote">On Fri, Oct 12, 2012 at 6:36 PM, C A <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:basic2point0@gmail.com" target="_blank">basic2point0@gmail.com</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;padding-left:1ex;border-left-color:rgb(204,204,204);border-left-width:1px;border-left-style:solid" class="gmail_quote">
<p>We're talking about a $200 tablet here though, not a $600 one. Please show me a $60 quad core tablet. I still don't see the point in buying a new low quality tablet with old technology when you can buy a good quality one with better technology for twice as much and not have to worry about migrating to a new system next year.</p>


<div class="gmail_quote"><div><div class="h5">On Oct 12, 2012 6:28 PM, "Chad Smith" <<a href="mailto:chad78@gmail.com" target="_blank">chad78@gmail.com</a>> wrote:<br type="attribution"></div></div><blockquote style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;padding-left:1ex;border-left-color:rgb(204,204,204);border-left-width:1px;border-left-style:solid" class="gmail_quote">
<div><div class="h5">
No, it's actually not cheaper.  Not when the tablet that will support future upgrades costs more than twice the one you will replace next year.  Especially when you consider (a) inflation (b) dropping prices of tech, specifically tablets (c) you will still have or can sell the old tablet when you get the new one.<div>



<br></div><div>It reminds me of a friend who bought a $75 watch while we were both in college.  I was floored.  But, he said, it will last me for years.  I told him I could buy a new watch every year for the rest of my life and not spend $75.  (They sell watches at the Dollar Tree.)<br>



<div><br></div><div>I'm not saying there's no reason to pay for quality.  There certainly is in some cases.  But there is also the law of diminishing returns.  Especially when the cheaper option comes with more "bells and whistles" than the expensive name brand ones.</div>



<div><br></div><div>I cannot for the life of me understand why anyone would buy a $600 tablet - ever.  I could get 10 tablets for that.</div><div><br clear="all"><font size="4"><i><span style="font-family:garamond,serif">-</span><font style="font-family:garamond,serif"> Chad W. Smith</font></i></font><div>



<font size="1"></font></div><br>
<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Fri, Oct 12, 2012 at 11:11 AM, C A <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:basic2point0@gmail.com" target="_blank">basic2point0@gmail.com</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;padding-left:1ex;border-left-color:rgb(204,204,204);border-left-width:1px;border-left-style:solid" class="gmail_quote">



<p>It's cheaper to buy a tablet that will support future upgrades than to buy one every time a newer version comes out.</p></blockquote></div></div></div>
<br></div></div><div class="im">_______________________________________________<br>
Chugalug mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Chugalug@chugalug.org" target="_blank">Chugalug@chugalug.org</a><br>
<a href="http://chugalug.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/chugalug" target="_blank">http://chugalug.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/chugalug</a><br>
<br></div></blockquote></div>
</blockquote></div><br>