Yup. I've done some things for my job with Node.js and websockets.<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Mon, Oct 1, 2012 at 11:04 PM, Dan Lyke <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:danlyke@flutterby.com" target="_blank">danlyke@flutterby.com</a>></span> wrote:<br>

<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">I just discovered the Meteor web server, and am looking for cool things<br>
it can do.<br>
<br>
Meteor is a server you run to push real-time (for second or so meanings<br>
of "real time") data to web pages. So, for instance, if you were<br>
writing the next Twitter, you'd create a web page that loaded a Meteor<br>
server JavaScript snippet, tell that JavaScript to listen on a channel,<br>
and then you'd connect to the control port of the server and send it<br>
updates for channels.<br>
<br>
So for my test app I wrote a little HTML page that had an input box, a<br>
submit button, and a <ul id="messages"></ul>.<br>
<br>
My submit button takes the input box contents and sends it off to a CGI.<br>
<br>
The CGI opens a IO::Socket::INET stream to the control port, prints<br>
<br>
  ADDMESSAGE streamname [the contents of the text box]<br>
<br>
which then causes Meteor to send an event out to my HTML page, which<br>
has a JavaScript snippet that:<br>
<br>
   $("#messages").append("<li>" + data + "</li>")<br>
<br>
Poof. Instant chat server.<br>
<br>
Their demo is little twinkly stars dependent on the IP address of the<br>
server that's accessing their web page currently.<br>
<br>
A little JSON and some database storage, and more stream names, and<br>
you've got a small Twitter...<br>
<br>
This thing is kinda cool.<br>
<br>
Dan<br>
<br>
_______________________________________________<br>
Chugalug mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Chugalug@chugalug.org">Chugalug@chugalug.org</a><br>
<a href="http://chugalug.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/chugalug" target="_blank">http://chugalug.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/chugalug</a><br>
</blockquote></div><br>