embedded graph

Evidence links China to Github attack

From: Rod-Lists 
------------------------------------------------------

Four separate security researchers have said that international web traffic to sites that use analytics tools provided by search firm Baidu was being hijacked in China.
According to analysis published by Erik Hjelmvik of the firm Netresec, when browsers requested script from the Chinese firm's servers, as they normally would, malicious code was inserted into the reply.
"The upshot is that people from around the world... had their traffic redirected to swamp GitHub," Prof Alan Woodward of the University of Surrey told the BBC after verifying the research.

http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-32138088

Triple your internet speed. . ..

From: Jonathan Calloway 
------------------------------------------------------
This was funny. . .=20

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3DnRmMkiTB

Acceptable percentage of packet loss?

From: Matt Keys 
------------------------------------------------------
I've recently helped a friend with a network installation for his new auto =
repair shop. He decided to use Charter business class cable as the ISP. Whi=
le testing the VPN I configured for him (openVPN default UDP transport) I n=
oticed frequent disconnections. I pinged the cable modem IP on a 1000 count=
, 1500 byte packet size test from various locations in the US. I was seeing=
 anywhere between 10-30% packet loss on each test. With standard/default si=
ze ping, it was slightly less, around 5-15%. Ingress to the Charter gateway=
, the result was 0% consistently. Egress from the modem to the Charter gate=
way I also observed around the same percentage of packet loss.


I switched VPN transport to TCP as a work-around and asked my friend to cal=
l Charter support to open a ticket. The tech arrived and said he could see =
the packet loss as well, but the percentage was "within the acceptable rang=
e". I can't seem to locate this "acceptable range" anywhere in their docume=
ntation, e.g.


https://www.charter.com/browse/content/network


Just curious... what would you guys consider an "acceptable percentage of p=
acket loss" on a business class cable circuit?


Linux has spoiled me

From: Mike Harrison 
------------------------------------------------------
Just ranting while watching things download and install on an MS-Server:

I’m building a testbed for some future Linux integration with Microsoft Biztalk, an “enterprise service bus / message queue” on a VM. I’m a few days of playing around, on my 4th install (I’ve made some stupid mistakes and had to start over) and learned a lot. 

Mostly what I’ve learned from the Linux and Mac worlds is: I’m spoiled. 

Linux servers, until you get into really weird stuff, just seem to be couple of yum installs or apt-get’s away from having just about anything you would normally want, up and running. On the weirder stuff, you might have to add a few things from the standard apt/yum/etc repo’s and then either use a private repo or compile something from scratch. Compiling being a rarer option than it used to be, but is still a good option for special cases. 

I’m pretty crusty on MS-Stuff, so I’ve had to learn a lot that I have intentionally forgotten. But what really surprises me is how different the processes are for installing various Microsoft products. Although the “Server Manager” has a decent start with “Add roles and features” it’s a subset of things, and I think it is missing some common essentials. For other things I’ve had to download installers and run them, use “CAB’s” and “Box’s”.. the weirdest one was install a 32 bit version of Excel, on a 64 bit Server OS because “BAM” requires it and won’t work on 32 bit.. I’ve lost track of the reboots, extra installations... uninstalls (SQL Server Express is installed with Visual Studio, but must be removed so you can install SQL Server).. Obscure menu tree hunting to find an option to turn on or off…  I’ve even found and been following several different official how-to’s that do not agree. But it works. Or at least seems to be. I have yet to use it for anything. It’s obvious that Microsoft has groups that don’t “come together” on how to install software, deal with requirements. Microsoft seems to be missing a company/product line wide package manager, and that seems to be a very antiquated thought process. and some things seem to be only available in 32 bit.. like the BI Tools for Visual Studio. Come on Microsoft, why would things you would run on a nice 64 bit server, requiring 32 bit packages for support? 


That a worldwide collective of a wide range of Linux programmer and sysadmins do such a great job of repositories and installations from them, makes me realize how spoiled I have become, and how thankful I am for everyone’s efforts. 




Laptops with known Linux support

From: Unkmar 
------------------------------------------------------
I'm planning to purchase a few identical laptops with a few minimal
requirements.

1. Everything works on Linux, preferably Debian.  My arm can be twisted to
allow Ughbuntu.
2. Dual boot.  I need Windows to be on these systems, whether I like it or
not.  The end users will need it.
3. $300-$600.  Clearly the lower number is preferable. Yet..
4. Intel CPU.  As close to i7 as possible.
5. Not Lenovo.  Last I knew, those guys still whitelist their WiFi cards
and I strongly disagree with any form of lock-in.

Well, I guess that covers it.  Obviously more memory is better.  Anything
over 2Gb should be fine.  I'm hoping for 4Gb to 8Gb.

Honestly, drive size and type just doesn't matter much to me.  SSD or Not.
Sure, they boot amazingly fast.  Just not a deal maker either way.   And I
haven't really out grown storage in years unless I horde loads of junk I
don't use anyway.

I'm asking for you help because some of you may have already successfully
done the research. I've looked around and just get frustrated from the
prices jumping around a grand any time I get comfortable with the
specifications.  I'm trying to settle for less and having a hard time
finding anything *NEW* in desired price range.  New is not really the
requirement.  Identical laptops fully supporting Linux and Legal copies of
Windows 7 or higher.  (Identical !!!)

Thanks in advance.
Lucius L. Hilley III

PS: Help me provide a great late X-mas/Birthdary present for a few kids.